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EtymologyEdit

From Latin porrum.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /porə/, [ˈpʰoːɐ]

NounEdit

porre c (singular definite porren, plural indefinite porrer)

  1. leek (Allium ampeloprasum, syn. Allium porrum)
DescendantsEdit
  • Icelandic: púrra, púrrulaukur

InflectionEdit

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

VerbEdit

porre

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of porren

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Latin pōnere (to put, place), with pōnō > *ponjo> *pogno > pongo subsumed to the 'L-pattern' of vengo (cf. Old Italian vegno, vegnamo, vegnono) in a much-debated process of 'velar allomorphy'. This is mirrored in Spanish pongo, vengo, but with an opposite outcome in Portuguese ponho, venho.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpor.re/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -orre
  • Hyphenation: pór‧re

VerbEdit

pórre (first-person singular present póngo, first-person singular past historic pósi, past participle pósto or pòsto, first-person singular imperfect ponévo, auxiliary avére) (transitive)

  1. to put
    Synonym: mettere
  2. to set, to place
    Synonym: collocare
  3. to lay down
    Synonym: posare

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • porre in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Paul O’neill (2015-06-01), “The Origin and Spread of Velar Allomorphy in the Spanish Verb: A Morphomic Approach”, in Bulletin of Hispanic Studies[1], retrieved 2021-03-04

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

porre m (oblique plural porres, nominative singular porres, nominative plural porre)

  1. Alternative form of pore

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

porre m (plural porres)

  1. (Brazil, informal) drunkenness
  2. (Brazil, informal) something tedious

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit