AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin venīre, present active infinitive of veniō.

VerbEdit

venir

  1. to come

CatalanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan venir, from Latin venīre, present active infinitive of veniō, from Proto-Italic *gʷenjō, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷm̥yéti, from zero-grade of *gʷem- + *-yéti.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

venir (first-person singular present vinc, past participle vingut)

  1. (intransitive) to come

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Franco-ProvençalEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin veniō.

VerbEdit

venir

  1. to come

ConjugationEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French venir, from Old French venir, from Latin venīre, present active infinitive of veniō, from Proto-Italic *gʷenjō, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷm̥yéti, from zero-grade of *gʷem- + *-yéti (English come). Compare Portuguese vir, Spanish venir.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /və.niʁ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iʁ

VerbEdit

venir

  1. (intransitive) To come (to move from one place to another that is nearer the speaker)
    Viens vivre avec moi en France.Come live with me in France.

ConjugationEdit

This is a verb in a group of -ir verbs. All verbs ending in -venir, such as convenir and devenir, are conjugated this way.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Haitian Creole: vin, vini

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


IdoEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

venir

  1. past infinitive of venar

InterlinguaEdit

VerbEdit

venir

  1. to come
    Antonym: ir

ConjugationEdit


ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

venir

  1. Apocopic form of venire

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French venir.

VerbEdit

venir

  1. to come (go to a specified location)
    Coordinate term: aller

DescendantsEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French venir, from Latin venire, present active infinitive of veniō (hold, keep).

VerbEdit

venir

  1. to come

ConjugationEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan venir, from Latin venīre, present active infinitive of veniō.

VerbEdit

venir

  1. to come

ConjugationEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

First known attestation 881 in The Sequence of Saint Eulalia. From Latin venīre, present active infinitive of veniō.

VerbEdit

venir

  1. to come; to arrive
    • 13th century, Unknown, La Vie de Saint Laurent, page 10, column 1, line 2:
      Quant Saint Lorenz i est venu
      When Saint Laurence arrived

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. This verb has a stressed present stem vien distinct from the unstressed stem ven, as well as other irregularities. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

DescendantsEdit


Old OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin venīre, present active infinitive of veniō.

VerbEdit

venir

  1. to come (arrive at a given location)

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin venīre.

VerbEdit

venir

  1. to come
    • between 1140-1207, Anonymous (or Per Abbat), Cantar de mío Cid line 3668:
      Essora dixo el Rey venid uos ami compaña
      (modernized spelling) Esora dijo el rey, venidvos (=veníos) a mi compaña
      At that moment, the king said, "Come, both of you, to my company (=to accompany me)..."
    • between 1140-1207, Anonymous (or Per Abbat), Cantar de mío Cid lines 1943-1944:
      Con todo esto auos dixo alfonsso / q̃ uos vernie avistas do ouiessedes sabor
      (modernized spelling) Con todo esto, a vos dijo Alfonso que vos vernié (=vendría) a vistas do hobiésedes (=hubieseis) sabor
      With all this, (king) Alphonse said that he'd come to see you wherever you'd like

DescendantsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish venir, from Latin venīre, present active infinitive of veniō, from Proto-Italic *gʷenjō, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷm̥yéti, from zero-grade of *gʷem- + *-yéti. Compare French venir, Portuguese vir.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

venir (first-person singular present vengo, first-person singular preterite vine, past participle venido)

  1. to come
  2. (reflexive, slang) To achieve orgasm; to cum; to ejaculate.

Usage notesEdit

  • Venir is used a bit differently in Spanish than "come" in English. Venir always references movement towards the speaker, whereas "come" can signify movement towards either the speaker or the listener. The phrase "I'm coming home today" (towards the listener), would not use venir in Spanish, but ir (to go): "Voy a casa hoy."

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit