protest

See also: Protest

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From the Middle English verb protesten, from Old French protester, from Latin prōtestārī, present active infinitive of prōtestor, from prō + testor, from testis (witness).

PronunciationEdit

Noun

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpɹəʊ.tɛst/
  • (US) enPR: prōʹtĕst, IPA(key): /ˈpɹoʊ.tɛst/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: pro‧test

Verb

  • enPR: prə.tĕstʹ, IPA(key): /pɹəˈtɛst/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛst
  • Hyphenation: pro‧test

VerbEdit

protest (third-person singular simple present protests, present participle protesting, simple past and past participle protested)

  1. (intransitive) To make a strong objection.
    How dare you, I protest!
    The public took to the streets to protest over the planned change to the law.
    • 1915, G[eorge] A. Birmingham [pseudonym; James Owen Hannay], chapter I, in Gossamer, New York, N.Y.: George H. Doran Company, OCLC 5661828:
      As a political system democracy seems to me extraordinarily foolish, but I would not go out of my way to protest against it. My servant is, so far as I am concerned, welcome to as many votes as he can get. I would very gladly make mine over to him if I could.
    • 2009, Cuba:
      U.S. and European protested against Spanish conduct in Cuba.
  2. (transitive) To affirm (something).
    I protest my innocence.
    I do protest and declare …
    • 1598–1599 (first performance), William Shakespeare, “Much Adoe about Nothing”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene i]:
      I will protest your cowardice.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling
      Our youth, now, emboldened with his success, resolved to push the matter farther, and ventured even to beg her recommendation of him to her father's service; protesting that he thought him one of the honestest fellows in the country, and extremely well qualified for the place of a gamekeeper, which luckily then happened to be vacant.
    • 1919, W. Somerset Maugham, The Moon and Sixpence, Ch.8
      She flashed a smile at me, and, protesting an engagement with her dentist, jauntily walked on.
  3. (transitive, chiefly Canada, US) To object to.
    They protested the demolition of the school.
  4. To call as a witness in affirming or denying, or to prove an affirmation; to appeal to.
  5. (law, transitive) to make a solemn written declaration, in due form, on behalf of the holder, against all parties liable for any loss or damage to be sustained by non-acceptance or non-payment of (a bill or note). This should be made by a notary public, whose seal it is the usual practice to affix.
  6. (obsolete, transitive) To publish; to make known.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

protest (countable and uncountable, plural protests)

  1. A formal objection, especially one by a group.
    They lodged a protest with the authorities.
  2. A collective gesture of disapproval; a demonstration.
    We held a protest in front of City Hall.
  3. The noting by a notary public of an unpaid or unaccepted bill.
  4. A written declaration, usually by the master of a ship, stating the circumstances attending loss or damage of ship or cargo, etc.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

protest m

  1. protest

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • protest in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • protest in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French [Term?], from Old French [Term?], from Latin protestō.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /proːˈtɛst/
  • Hyphenation: pro‧test
  • Rhymes: -ɛst

NounEdit

protest n (plural protesten, diminutive protestje n)

  1. protest (occasion to express dissatisfaction)
  2. protest (expression of disagreement)

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: protes

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin protestari, as for protestere

NounEdit

protest m (definite singular protesten, indefinite plural protester, definite plural protestene)

  1. a protest

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin protestari

NounEdit

protest m (definite singular protesten, indefinite plural protestar, definite plural protestane)

  1. a protest

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From German Protest, from Italian protesto, from Latin prōtestārī, present active infinitive of prōtestor, from prō + testor, from testis (witness).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

protest m inan

  1. (law) protest (formal objection)
  2. protest (demonstration)

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • protest in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • protest in Polish dictionaries at PWN

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Back-formation from protesta

NounEdit

protest n (plural proteste)

  1. protest

DeclensionEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Protest.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /prǒtest/
  • Hyphenation: pro‧test

NounEdit

pròtest m (Cyrillic spelling про̀тест)

  1. protest

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

protest c

  1. protest

DeclensionEdit

Declension of protest 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative protest protesten protester protesterna
Genitive protests protestens protesters protesternas

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English protest.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈprɔtɛsd/, [ˈpr̥ʰɔtʰɛst]

NounEdit

protest f (plural protestiadau or protestadau)

  1. protest, demonstration (collective gesture of disapproval)
    • 2020 November 11, BBC Cymru Fyw[1]:
      Mae dwsinau o ddynion sydd wedi cael eu cartrefi mewn gwersyll ym Mhenalun, Sir Benfro wedi cynnal protest dros eu hamodau byw. Cynhaliodd y dynion brotest yn hawlio bod eu hawliau dynol yn cael eu hanwybyddu.
      Dozens of men who have been housed in a camp in Penally, Pembrokeshire have held a protest over their living conditions. The men held a protest claiming that their human rights were being ignored.
    Synonym: gwrthdystiad

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
protest brotest mhrotest phrotest
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “protest”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies