Last modified on 8 February 2015, at 14:26

skift

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

skift (plural skifts)

  1. (Appalachia) A light dusting of snow.
    • 2010, Mark Parman, A Grouse Hunter’s Almanac: The Other Kind of Hunting (page 84)
      A skift of snow had fallen overnight on the ski trails, and Paul had yet to groom them and erase the tracks in the new snow.

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old English sciftan (To divide, distribute, allot, place, order, arrange).

NounEdit

skift (plural skifts)

  1. share, portion, lot
    There be many knyghtes that hath envy to us; Therefore whan we shall mete at the day of justis there woll be harde skyffte for us. — Malory
  1. fate
  2. effort, attempt, try
    Make ye as good skyffte as ye can, ye shall bere this lady with you on horsebak unto the Pope of Rome. — Malory

VerbEdit

skift (third-person singular simple present skifteth, present participle skiftende, simple past and past participle skifted)

  1. To divide, share, distribute, divide up; also, be divided;
  2. To disperse, scatter ~ in sonder,
  3. To give a fair share ~ even,
    even skifted, evenly matched in number, in equal strength
  4. To arrange, ordain, cause to occur, rule, manage
    Grete godd wolde so wisely skifte all thynges.The Prose Life of Alexander
  5. To protect, save
  6. To evade, be rid of.
    be skifted of, She was aferde of hym..and she cowde not be skyfte … of hym by no meane. — Malory

ConjugationEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

skift

  1. imperative of skifte

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

skift n

  1. shift

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit


West FrisianEdit

NounEdit

skift n (plural skiften)

  1. order (taxonomy)