specie

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Originally in the phrase in specie; from Latin speciē, ablative singular of species. Compare payment in kind.

NounEdit

specie ‎(uncountable)

  1. Type or kind, in various uses of the phrase in specie.
  2. Money, especially in the form of coins made from precious metal, that has an intrinsic value; coinage.
    • 1830, Joseph Plumb Martin, A Narrative of Some of the Adventures, Dangers and Sufferings of a Revolutionary Soldier, Ch. IX:
      I received one month's pay in specie while on the march to Virginia, in the year 1781, and except that, I never received any pay worth the name while I belonged to the army.
    • 1982, Lawrence Durrell, Constance, Faber & Faber 2004 (Avignon Quintet), p. 805:
      ‘It was not money or specie he thought himself hunting!’
    • 2006, Thomas Pynchon, Against the Day, Vintage 2007, p. 8:
      “Dick” Counterfly had absquatulated swiftly into the night, leaving his son with only a pocketful of specie and the tender admonition, “Got to ‘scram,’ kid — write if you get work.”
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

back-formation from species (plural), the final "s" being misinterpreted as a plural ending.

NounEdit

specie

  1. (proscribed) singular of species
Usage notesEdit
  • Although in wide use, this is universally considered by prescriptive references to be an error.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: spe‧cie

NounEdit

specie f ‎(plural speciën or species)

  1. mortar (in sense of mixture of lime or cement, sand and water)

ItalianEdit

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin speciēs, speciei.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

specie

  1. especially, particularly
    Nonostante la sua abilità, Clemens ha avuto poca fama, specie tra i suoi contemporanei.
    Despite his ability, Clemens had little fame, particularly among his contemporaries.

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

specie f ‎(invariable)

  1. kind, type, sort
  2. (biology) species, strain, breed
  3. (taxonomy) species

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

speciē

  1. ablative singular of species

PrepositionEdit

speciē

  1. Under the pretext of. Under the guise of.

ReferencesEdit

  • specie” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) in truth; really: re (vera), reapse (opp. specie)
    • (ambiguous) apparently; to look at: specie (De Amic. 13. 47)

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin speciēs.

NounEdit

specie f ‎(plural specii)

  1. (biology) species
  2. kind, type, sort

See alsoEdit

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