See also: Tage and tåge

CimbrianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • tag (Sette Comuni)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German tag, tac, from Old High German tag, tac, from Proto-West Germanic *dag, from Proto-Germanic *dagaz. Cognate with German Tag, English day.

NounEdit

tage m (plural tang)

  1. (Luserna) day

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Danish takæ, taghæ, from Old Norse taka, from Proto-Germanic *tēkaną (to touch). Cognate with Norwegian ta, Swedish ta, and Dutch taken. English take is an early loan from Old Norse.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ta(ːˀ)/, [ˈtˢa], [ˈtˢæˀ]
  • Rhymes: -a

VerbEdit

tage (past tense tog, past participle taget, attributive common tagen, attributive definite or plural tagne)

  1. to take, get, pick up
  2. to catch, hold
  3. to charge (to take money)
  4. to go somewhere (with a preposition phrase)
  5. to occupy, steal (to take what is not yours)
  6. to pick up (a phone)
    Vi har prøvet at komme i kontakt med hende, men hun tager ikke sin telefon.
    We've tried contacting her, but she's not picking up her phone.
    Vil du tage den? Mine hænder er våde.
    Will you pick it up? My hands are wet.
InflectionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /taːɣə/, [ˈtˢæːjə], [ˈtˢæːæ]

NounEdit

tage n

  1. indefinite plural of tag

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From tago +‎ -e.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdverbEdit

tage

  1. by day, during the day, in the daytime

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tage

  1. inflection of tagen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative