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BarasanaEdit

NounEdit

oko

  1. water
  2. rain

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • 1982, Hugh-Jones, Barasana Cosmology, in Ethnoastronomy and archaeoastronomy in the American tropics: oko sohe "the east (literally: the water door)", kuma oko "summer rain (by extension, any heavy rain)", oko uhu "master of water: the egret"

CarapanaEdit

NounEdit

oko

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Ronald G. Metzger, The Morpheme KA- of Carapana (Tucanoan)

CubeoEdit

NounEdit

oko

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Catching Language: The Standing Challenge of Grammar Writing (2006, →ISBN, citing Morse and Maxwell (1999)

CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *oko, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ekʷ-.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈoko/
  • (file)

NounEdit

oko n

  1. (anatomy) eye
  2. (card games) twenty-one, pontoon
  3. tarn
  4. eye (center of a storm)

Usage notesEdit

  • The plural of definition 1 takes the dual form, which changes the gender from neuter to feminine (seen in agreement, for example "modré oči" – "blue eyes").

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


EdoEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

oko

  1. something parceled for certain purposes like gift giving, etc.; parcel

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Agheyisi, Rebecca N. (1986) An Edo-English dictionary, Benin City: Ethiope, →ISBN
  2. ^ Melzian, Hans (1937) A Concise Dictionary of the Bini Language of Southern Nigeria[1], London: Kegal Paul, Trench, Trubner, page 142

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

ok (8) +‎ -o (noun)

NounEdit

oko (accusative singular okon, plural okoj, accusative plural okojn)

  1. a number or numeral 8
  2. eightsome, a set of eight of something
    la kera oko
    the eight of hearts

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Playing cards in Esperanto · ludkartoj (layout · text)
             
aso duo trio kvaro kvino seso sepo
             
oko naŭo deko fanto, bubo damo reĝo ĵokero

Galibi CaribEdit

Galibi Carib cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : oko

NumeralEdit

oko

  1. two

ReferencesEdit

  • Courtz, Hendrik (2008) A Carib grammar and dictionary[2], Toronto: Magoria Books, →ISBN, page 107.

GuaraníEdit

NounEdit

oko

  1. home

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

oko

  1. Rōmaji transcription of おこ

KoreguajeEdit

NounEdit

oko

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Classification of South American Indian Languages (1968), page 181

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *oko, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ekʷ-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

oko n (diminutive oczko, augmentative oczysko)

  1. (anatomy) eye
  2. drop of fat or oil floating on the surface of liquid
  3. (meteorology) eye of cyclone

DeclensionEdit

(anatomy) (other uses)
Note: ócz and oczów are rare

Further readingEdit

  • oko in Polish dictionaries at PWN

SecoyaEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

oko

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Linguistic series of the Summer Institute of Linguistics of the University of Oklahoma, issues 5-7 (1961)

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ôko/
  • Hyphenation: o‧ko

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Slavic *oko, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ekʷ-.

NounEdit

ȍko n (Cyrillic spelling о̏ко)

  1. (anatomy) eye
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PrepositionEdit

ȍko (Cyrillic spelling о̏ко) (+ genitive case)

  1. around, about, roughly, approximately
    Zaplijenjeno je oko 45 kg.Approximately 45 kg was seized.

SionaEdit

NounEdit

oko

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Classification of South American Indian Languages (1968), page 181

SlovakEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *oko, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ekʷ-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

oko n (genitive singular oka, nominative plural oči, oká, genitive plural očí/očú, ôk, declension pattern of mesto)

  1. eye
  2. sprout on a potato

DeclensionEdit

#1 #2

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • oko in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *oko, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ekʷ-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

okọ̑ n

  1. eye
  2. sprout on a potato

InflectionEdit

This noun has two plural forms, which are used in different situations:

  • When talking about the eyes in anatomical sense, the 2nd plural is used (for example: "My eyes hurt." - "Oči me bolijo."; or "The spiders have eight eyes." - "Pajki imajo osem oči.").
  • In other cases, where the word "oko" means other things (for example: "oko" meaning "a sprout on a potato"; or "kurje oko" meaning "a callus"), the normal plural is used.
  • The dual is used when referring specifically to both eyes (for example: "He lost both eyes in the war." - "V vojni je izgubil obe očesi.").

Tocharian BEdit

EtymologyEdit

May be a derivative ultimately of Proto-Indo-European *h₂ewg- (increase, grow); one theory suggests it was a borrowing from the Tocharian A oko, with the same meaning, but it was more likely that it was taken from B into A instead, as is more often the case. Alternatively, another plausible etymology may be Proto-Indo-European *h₂ógeh₂ (berry, fruit) (compare Lithuanian úoga, Latvian oga, Russian я́года (jágoda), Old English æcern (English acorn)).

NounEdit

oko

  1. fruit
  2. result, effect, consequence

TucanoEdit

NounEdit

okó

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Estudios tucanos (1979), issue 3, page 16: [oko] 'agua' /oko/
  • HG

TuyucaEdit

NounEdit

okó

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Janet Barnes, notes on Tuyuca in Tucano, in The Amazonian Languages (Robert M. W. Dixon)

WaraoEdit

PronounEdit

oko (singular iné)

  1. we, first person plural nominative pronoun
    Sina sisiko oko narutera. [1]
    With whom will we go.
    Osibu oko yabae nobotuma sina ribuae. [2]
    Some grandfathers said "we fished for morokoto".

See alsoEdit

  • (possessive) ka

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Romero-Figueroa 1997.34
  2. ^ Romero-Figueroa 1997.52-53

XhosaEdit

Etymology 1Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronounEdit

oko

  1. that; class 15 distal demonstrative.

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronounEdit

oko

  1. that; class 17 distal demonstrative.