EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Derived from Middle English teies, teyse, taken as a plural, from Anglo-Norman teice, from Old French teise, toise.

NounEdit

tey (plural teys)

  1. (historical) An English measure of length for rope, perhaps equivalent to the fathom.
    • 1866, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, volume 1, page 171:
      The tey or toise, the modern fathom, is employed as a measure of rope.

AnagramsEdit


FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

tey n pl

  1. they

DeclensionEdit

Demonstrative pronoun - ávísingarfornavn
Singular (eintal) m f n
Nominative (hvørfall) tann ()† tann ()† tað
Accusative (hvønnfall) tann ta () ()†
Dative (hvørjumfall) (tann) (teim)† teirri /
Genitive (hvørsfall) tess teirrar tess
Plural (fleirtal) m f n
Nominative (hvørfall) teir tær tey
Accusative (hvønnfall) teir ()†
Dative (hvørjumfall) teimum (teim)†
Genitive (hvørsfall) teirra

KayapóEdit

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): [tɛˈɯx]

NounEdit

tey

  1. stinger
  2. bird tail

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

tey

  1. Alternative form of teye (cord, chain)

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

tey

  1. Alternative form of teyen

YurokEdit

NounEdit

tey

  1. brother-in-law

ZaghawaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tey

  1. One without a mother and father; an orphan or a bastard (illegitimate child)
  2. (archaic) life

ReferencesEdit