EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Derived from Middle English teies, teyse, taken as a plural, from Anglo-Norman teice, from Old French teise, toise.

NounEdit

tey (plural teys)

  1. (historical) An English measure of length for rope, perhaps equivalent to the fathom.
    • 1866, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, volume 1, page 171:
      The tey or toise, the modern fathom, is employed as a measure of rope.

AnagramsEdit


FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

tey n pl

  1. they

DeclensionEdit

Demonstrative pronoun - ávísingarfornavn
Singular (eintal) m f n
Nominative (hvørfall) tann ()† tann ()† tað
Accusative (hvønnfall) tann ta ()
Dative (hvørjumfall) (tann) / teirri
Genitive (hvørsfall) tess teirrar tess
Plural (fleirtal) m f n
Nominative (hvørfall) teir tær tey
Accusative (hvønnfall) teir ()†
Dative (hvørjumfall) teimum
Genitive (hvørsfall) teirra

KayapóEdit

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): [tɛˈɯx]

NounEdit

tey

  1. stinger
  2. bird tail

YurokEdit

NounEdit

tey

  1. brother-in-law

ZaghawaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tey

  1. One without a mother and father; an orphan or a bastard (illegitimate child)
  2. (archaic) life

ReferencesEdit