English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Shortened from honey.

The transgender slang sense derives from the supposedly abundant use of "hon" as a term of address by older male-to-female transgender people, presumably as a way to verbally affect a femininity they are otherwise perceived by some to lack (due to not passing well), and is especially associated with the cliché phrase "you look great, hon".

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

hon (plural hons)

  1. (mostly as a term of address) Honey, sweetheart, a term of endearment; (Southern US) a friendly term of address.
    Hey, hon! How was your day at work?
  2. (transgender slang, 4chan, derogatory) A trans woman who does not pass; a clocky trans woman.
    Antonym: passoid
    This youngshit mogs me: I'm such a hon.
    • 2015 October 18, anonymous author, 4chan[3], /lgbt/:
      If you didn't experience that you'll end up one of those ugly SJW programmer transbian hons with dyed hair sucking each other's dicks while acting like men in every way possible.
    • [2018 July 10, @addamschloe, Twitter[4], archived from the original on 2022-05-07:
      [cw anti-trans slurs] I get that they're rarer than 'trap' (being used to describe trans women as intentional deceivers) but I'd like it if people could be equally hostile to the terms 'brick' and 'hon' honestly
      it's all transmisic garbage
      ]
    • [2018 July 10, @addamschloe, Twitter[5], archived from the original on 2021-06-05:
      'brick' refers to a trans woman who doesn't 'pass', 'hon' refers to a trans woman who doesn't pass and also is nice to other trans women who don't pass, particularly used against older trans women]
    • 2020 May 12, @MsBdUnicorn, Twitter[6], archived from the original on 2023-02-20:
      Consider the fact that /tttt/ calls any positive trans space a hugbox full of hons. We're still hung up about passing and it's so pathetic.
    • 2022 June 2, @stacycay, Twitter[7], archived from the original on 2022-11-15:
      listen hon, if you're a "biological boy" that's cool and all but the rest of us are trans women.
    • [2022 September 16, @mishawave, Twitter[8], archived from the original on 2022-11-15:
      i feel like that depends on how you're using it. referring to yourself as a "hon", or using it as a joke, sure. but calling other trans people hons directly or indirectly is a bit far imo. it's an insult about something specific, so it's different from general slurs like "tranny"]
    • 2019 April 16, Andrea James, “Transgender slang, slurs, and controversial words”, in Transgender Map[9], archived from the original on 2023-04-08:
      It [the word "hon"] comes from the cliché, "You look great, hon," which is often used by older transitioners who do not "pass."
    • 2018 August 17, Natalie Wynn, “Incels”, in ContraPoints[10]:
      [24:45] On TTTT, a major piece of jargon is "hon," a slur used by trans women for other trans women.
Derived terms edit
Terms derived from hon (transgender slang)
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

The laugh probably originated as a parody of French singer and actor Maurice Chevalier (1888–1972) who was noted for his strong accent in English, and does not represent a typical French laugh.[1] The stereotype was popularized in Internet memes in the mid-2000s and 2010s.[2]

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

hon

  1. (humorous) Representing a stereotypical French laugh.
    Hon hon hon, oui oui baguette!

Etymology 3 edit

Clipping of come on with devoicing of /m/. Compare c'mon.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

hon

  1. (Ireland, slang); (typically) cheering a sports team, especially a GAA team; exhortation or encouragement come on; congratulations well done, bravo.

Etymology 4 edit

Noun edit

hon (plural hons)

  1. Alternative form of hoon (Indian gold coin)

References edit

  1. ^ “Why do people think the French say 'hon hon hon' when they laugh?”, in The Local[1], 14 March 2017, archived from the original on 2017-09-14
  2. ^ “Hon Hon Hon”, in Know Your Meme[2], launched 2007

Anagrams edit

Breton edit

Etymology edit

Compare Welsh ein. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation edit

Determiner edit

hon

  1. our

Catalan edit

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

hon

  1. Archaic form of on.

Further reading edit

  • “hon” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Chinese edit

Etymology edit

Clipping of English honours degree.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

hon

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese, education) (classification of) honours degree
    first hon畢業first hon毕业 [Hong Kong Cantonese]  ―  first on1 bat1 jip6 [Jyutping]  ―  to graduate with a first-class honour degree
    hon [Hong Kong Cantonese]  ―  mou5 on1 [Jyutping]  ―  [degree] without honours classification

Czech edit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *gònъ.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

hon m inan

  1. hunt, chase
    hon na liškufox hunt

Usage notes edit

  • While lov may refer to any kind of hunting, hon refers only to those which involve chasing such as of ducks or fox.

Declension edit

Related terms edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

  • hon in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • hon in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • hon in Internetová jazyková příručka

Faroese edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse hón, from Proto-Germanic *hēnō. Cognate with Icelandic hún, Danish hun and Norwegian Bokmål hun.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

hon

  1. she

Declension edit

Hungarian edit

Etymology edit

From the archaic honn (at home).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

hon (plural honok)

  1. (literary) home, homeland, fatherland
    Synonym: haza

Declension edit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative hon honok
accusative hont honokat
dative honnak honoknak
instrumental honnal honokkal
causal-final honért honokért
translative honná honokká
terminative honig honokig
essive-formal honként honokként
essive-modal
inessive honban honokban
superessive honon honokon
adessive honnál honoknál
illative honba honokba
sublative honra honokra
allative honhoz honokhoz
elative honból honokból
delative honról honokról
ablative hontól honoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
honé honoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
honéi honokéi
Possessive forms of hon
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. honom honaim
2nd person sing. honod honaid
3rd person sing. hona honai
1st person plural honunk honaink
2nd person plural honotok honaitok
3rd person plural honuk honaik

Derived terms edit

Compound words

Further reading edit

  • (homeland): hon in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (alternative form of honn (at home, rare, archaic)): hon in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Hunsrik edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Central Franconian hann, from Middle High German haben, from Old High German havēn, northern variant of habēn.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

hon

  1. to have
    Ich hon en gros Haus.
    I have a big house.
    Hod-der Zeid fer mich se hellfe?
    Do you have time to help me?
    Ich had en komischer Draam gester Nacht.
    I had a weird dream last night.
  2. (auxiliary, with a past participle) to have (forms the perfect)
    Er hod es gemach.
    He has done it.

Inflection edit

Irregular with past tense and conditional mood
infinitive hon
participle gehad
auxiliary hon
present
indicative
past
indicative
conditional
ich hon had häd
du host hast häst
er/sie/es hod had häd
meer hon hade häde
deer hod had häd
sie hon hade häd
The use of the present participle is uncommon, but can be made with the suffix -end.

Further reading edit

Icelandic edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From the archaic form hón.

Pronoun edit

hon (personal pronoun):

  1. (archaic) she

Declension edit

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

hon

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ほん

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Middle Irish úain (time), from Old Irish úan (loan), from oidid (to lend). Compare Irish uain (loan, time, leisure), Scottish Gaelic on, oin (loan, laziness).

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

hon (uncountable)

  1. (Northern, North Midland) delay, hesitation
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Scots: hune

References edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

hon (third-person singular simple present honeth, present participle honende, honynge, first-/third-person singular past indicative and past participle honed)

  1. Alternative form of honen (to linger)

Etymology 3 edit

Preposition edit

hon

  1. Alternative form of on

Etymology 4 edit

Numeral edit

hon

  1. Alternative form of oon

Pronoun edit

hon

  1. Alternative form of oon

Etymology 5 edit

Noun edit

hon (plural hones)

  1. Alternative form of hond

Etymology 6 edit

Verb edit

hon (third-person singular simple present hoþ, present participle honde, first-/third-person singular past indicative heng, past participle ihon)

  1. (Early Middle English) Alternative form of hongen

Old English edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *hą̄han.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

hōn

  1. to hang
  2. to suspend

Conjugation edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

Old French edit

Noun edit

hon m

  1. Alternative form of hom

Old Swedish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse hón, from Proto-Germanic *hēnō.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

hōn

  1. she

Declension edit

Descendants edit

Rohingya edit

Etymology edit

Cognate with Assamese কোন (kün), Hindi कौन (kaun), Romani kon.

Pronoun edit

hon

  1. who

Swedish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Swedish hōn, from Old Norse hón, from Proto-Germanic *hēnō (compare *ainaz). Cognate with Icelandic hún, Danish hun and Norwegian Bokmål hun.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

hon

  1. she; the third-person, singular, feminine pronoun in the nominative case
    Hon är mycket vacker.
    She is very beautiful.
  2. it (for certain nouns that were feminine in Old Swedish)
    Vad är hon?
    What (time) is it?
    Går hon bra?
    Is it (the car) working all right?
Declension edit

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

hon

  1. definite singular of ho

References edit

Vilamovian edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German haben, from Old High German havēn, northern variant of habēn.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

hon

  1. to have

Welsh edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Celtic *sindos.

Pronunciation edit

Determiner edit

hon f

  1. (formal) (in conjuction with the definite article y) that
    Mae'r nofel hon yn well o lawer na'r nofel honno.
    This novel is a lot better than that novel.
    Mae'r holl sefyllfa hon yn benbleth fawr.
    This entire situation is real condundrum.

Usage notes edit

  • Refers to grammatically feminie singular nouns, hwn (this) being the masculine singular and hyn (this) the (masculine and feminine) plural equivalents.
  • In informal language, hon as a determiner is replaced with yma (there) used in conjunction with the definite article y, , or in some southern dialects with the definite article and hyn.
    (formal) y ddadl honthis debate
    = (informal) y ddadl 'ma
    = (South Wales, informal) y ddadl hyn
    (formal) yr eiliad honthis second
    = (informal) yr eiliad 'ma
    = (South Wales, informal) yr eiliad hyn

Pronoun edit

hon f

  1. this
    Mae hon yn well o lawer na honno.
    This is a lot better than that.
    Mae hon yn benbleth fawr.
    This is real condundrum.

Usage notes edit

  • Refers to grammatically feminine singular nouns, hwn (this) being the masculine singular equivalent. In addition, hyn (this) is used nonreferentially, for example, when talking about a general situation, action or event, rather than any particular noun.

Related terms edit

References edit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “hon”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Zuni edit

Pronoun edit

hon

  1. First person dual subject (medial position)
    we two
  2. First person plural subject (medial position)
    we (three or more)

Related terms edit

See also edit