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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin ultrāmarīnus, from ultrā + marīnus. May be decomposed as ultra- +‎ marine.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ultramarine (countable and uncountable, plural ultramarines)

  1. A brilliant blue pigment that is either extracted from mineral deposits or made synthetically; traditionally made from ground-up lapis lazuli.
  2. A brilliant pure dark blue or slightly purplish colour.
    • 1891, Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urbervilles, volume 1, London: James R. Osgood, McIlvaine and Co., page 12:
      The atmosphere beneath is languorous, and is so tinged with azure that what artists call the middle distance partakes also of that hue, while the horizon beyond is of the deepest ultramarine.
    ultramarine colour:  

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ultramarine (comparative more ultramarine, superlative most ultramarine)

  1. Of a brilliant blue colour.
  2. Beyond the sea.
    • 1769, Edmund Burke, Observations on a Late State of the Nation, fourth edition, London: J. Dodsley, pages 10–11:
      If the war is carried on in the colonies, he [George Grenville] tells them that the loſs of her [France’s] ultramarine dominions leſſens her expences, and enſures her remittances []

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ultramarine

  1. feminine singular of ultramarin

GermanEdit

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ultramarine

  1. Feminine plural of adjective ultramarino.