See also: aqua- and àqua

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English aqua (water), borrowed from Latin aqua. Perhaps also learnedly borrowed directly from Latin. Doublet of ea.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈækwə/, /ˈɑːkwə/

NounEdit

aqua (countable and uncountable, plural aquas or aquae)

  1. (inorganic chemistry) The compound water.
  2. A shade of colour, usually a mix of blue and green similar to the colour turquoise.
    aqua colour:  
    • 2009 June 27, Patricia Cohen, “Employing Art Along With Ambassadors”, in New York Times[1]:
      Ms. Rockburne, with help from a team of artists, is working on a gargantuan mural of deep blues, shimmering aquas and luminous gold leaf that is headed for the American Embassy in Kingston, Jamaica.
    Synonym: aquamarine

AdjectiveEdit

aqua (comparative more aqua, superlative most aqua)

  1. Of a greenish-blue colour.
    Synonym: aquamarine

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


IdoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈaku̯a/, /ˈakva/

AdjectiveEdit

aqua

  1. aqueous

InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

aqua (plural aquas)

  1. water

InterlingueEdit

NounEdit

aqua

  1. water

IstriotEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aqua.

NounEdit

aqua f (plural aque)

  1. water

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

aqua f (plural aque)

  1. Obsolete form of acqua.
    1. water

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *akʷā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ékʷeh₂. Cognate with Old English ēa (flowing water, stream, river). More at ea.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aqua f (genitive aquae); first declension

  1. water
    • 405 CE, Jerome, Vulgate Genesis.1.2:
      Terra autem erat inānis et vacua, et tenebrae erant super faciem abyssī: et spīritus Deī ferēbātur super aquās.
      And the earth was void and empty, and darkness was upon the face of the deep; and the spirit of God moved over the waters.
    • 405 CE, Jerome, Vulgate Genesis.1.6:
      Dīxit quoque Deus fīat firmāmentum in mediō aquārum et dīvidat aquās ab aquīs.
      And God said, Let there be a firmament in the midst of the waters, and let it divide the waters from the waters.
    • 8th C. C.E., Paulus Diaconus (author), Karl Otfried Müller (editor), Excerpta ex libris Pompeii Festi De significatione verborum (1839), page 2, line 14:
      Aqua dīcitur, ā quā iuvāmur.
      Water is called that by which we are helped.

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative aqua aquae
Genitive aquae aquārum
Dative aquae aquīs
Accusative aquam aquās
Ablative aquā aquīs
Vocative aqua aquae
  • The genitive singular is also archaic aquai.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • aqua in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • aqua in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • aqua in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • aqua in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the surface of the water: summa aqua
    • to stand out of the water: ex aqua exstare
    • the water reaches to the waist: aqua est umbilīco tenus
    • the water is up to, is above, the chest: aqua pectus aequat, superat
    • to come to the surface: (se) ex aqua emergere
    • to draw off water from a river: aquam ex flumine derivare
    • to bring a stream of water through the garden: aquam ducere per hortum
    • a conduit; an aqueduct: aquae ductus (plur. aquarum ductus)
    • running water: aqua viva, profluens (opp. stagnum)
    • a perpetual spring: aqua iugis, perennis
    • ill-watered: aquae, aquarum inops
    • to slake one's thirst by a draught of cold water: sitim haustu gelidae aquae sedare
    • to proscribe a person, declare him an outlaw: aqua et igni interdicere alicui
  • aqua in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

Further readingEdit