venire

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Latin venire ‎(to come), from venire facias ‎(make or cause to come) (from the opening words of the writ).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ve.ˈni.re/
  • Hyphenation: ve‧ni‧re

NounEdit

venire ‎(plural venires)

  1. (law) A writ of venire facias.
    • 1729, Giles Jacob, A New Law-dictionary Containing the Interpretation and Definition of Words and Terms Used in the Law; and also the Whole Law, and the Practice thereof, under all the Heads and Titles thereof. Together with such Informations Relating thereto, as Explain the History and Antiquity of the Law, and our Manners, Customs, and Original Government. Abstracted from all Dictionaries, Abridgements, Institutes, Reports, Year-Books, Charters, Registers, Chronicles, and Histories, Published to this Time. And Fitted for the Use of Barristers, Students, and Practisers of the Law, Members of Parliament, and other Gentlemen, Justices of Peace, Clergymen, &c., In the Savoy [London]: Printed by E. and R. Nutt, and R. Gosling, (Assigns of E. Sayer, Esq;) for J. and J. Knapton [et al.], OCLC 900653560, page [704]:
      [W]here a Venire omits Part of the Iſſue, or any of the Parties; if a Juror is named in the Habeas Corpora, by a Name different from that in the Venire; or a Juror return'd on ſuch a Panel is omitted in the Habeas Corpora; or a Venire or Diſtringas are iſſued without any Award on the Roll to warrant them; it will be ill, and is ſaid to be a Diſcontinuance.
    • 1817, T[homas] B[ayly] Howell; Thomas Jones Howell, “582. Proceedings on the Trial of an Information, filed Ex-Officio by his Majesty's Attorney General, against John Lambert, James Perry, and James Gray, for a Seditious Libel. Tried by a Special Jury in the Court of King's Bench, before the Right Hon. Lloyd Lord Kenyon, on Monday the 9th of December: 34 George III. A.D. 1793.”, in A Complete Collection of State Trials and Proceedings for High Treason and other Crimes and Misdemeanors from the Earliest Period to the Year 1783: With Notes and other Illustrations: Compiled by T. B. Howell, Esq. F.R.S. F.S.A. And Continued from from the Year 1783 to the Present Time: By Thomas Jones Howell, Esq., volume XXII (volume I of the continuation), London: Printed by T. C. Hansard, Peterborough-Court, Fleet-Street: For Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown [et al.], OCLC 495782310, page 979/980:
      The crown may have as many venires as it pleases. Suppose there had been no venire at all, would a defence have aided that error? In the case of Young and Watson there was no return to the venire, and yet there was held error after verdict. The Court might have granted a new rule after the old one was expired, and a venire de novo would have issued in that case, 2 Roll. Ab. 720, p. 2.
    • 1842 April 23, “Gee v. Swann”, in Montagu[e] Chambers, editor, The Law Journal Reports for the Year 1842: Comprising Reports of Cases in the Courts of Chancery, and Bankruptcy, Queen's Bench, Common Pleas, Exchequer of Pleas, Exchequer Chamber, and the Bail Court, from Michaelmas Term, 1841, to Trinity Term, 1842, both Inclusive; and Notes of Judgments in the House of Lords, during that Period, volume XX (New Series – volume XI. Part II. Cases at Common Law), London: E. B. Ince, 5, Quality Court, Chancery Lane, OCLC 70896711, page 291:
      A venire de novo may be granted for a defect which does not appear on the record; as, for instance, if the jury improperly eat or drink before they deliver their verdict [] In Dovey v. Hobson [], the Court awarded a venire de novo where a juryman was sworn who had not been summoned. In Arundel's case [], a venire de novo was awarded where the jury had been summoned from a wrong county.
    • 1871, George W[illiam] Clinton, A Digest of the Reported Decisions at Law and in Equity, of the Courts of the State of New York, from Its Organization to the Year 1860, volume III, Albany, N.Y.: William Gould & Sons, OCLC 19449558, pages 1941–1942:
      [page 1941] Where a venire has been issued, the justice cannot proceed to try the cause without a jury. Sebring v. Wheedon, 8 Johns. 460. Day v. Wilber, 2 Cai. 134. [] [page 1942] Where a venire is demanded by either party, the justice may deliver it himself to the constable, to be executed; but if he delivers it to the party, and he does not appear at the time to which the cause is adjourned for trial, and the venire is not returned, the justice may consider the suppression of the venire by the party as a waiver of the trial by jury, and proceed to hear and decide the cause himself, as if no venire had been demanded or issued. Coon v. Snyder, 19 Johns. 384.
  2. (law, chiefly US) A group of persons summoned by a writ of venire facias to appear in court for jury selection.
    • 1986, D[avid] H. Kaye; Mikel Aickin, Statistical Methods in Discrimination Litigation [Statistics, Textbooks and Monographs; vol. 69], New York, N.Y.: Marcel Dekker, Inc., ISBN 978-0-8247-7514-8, pages 24–25:
      [T]he jury that in 1968 convicted the pediatrician Dr. Benjamin Spock and others protesting the Vietnam War of conspiring to violate the Military Service Act of 1967 by advocating the destruction of draft cards [] was devoid of women, largely because the venire from which this jury was formed contained only 9% women. A subsequent analysis of the distribution of the proportion of women in the venires of all the judges in the district showed that the venires for one judge – the Spock trial judge – had a distribution centered about an unusually low proportion of women.
    • 2012, Fred L. Ramsey; Daniel W. Schafer, The Statistical Sleuth: A Course in Methods of Data Analysis, 3rd edition, Boston, Mass.: Brooks/Cole, ISBN 978-1-133-58819-1, page 117:
      The Spock defense pointed to the venire for their trial, which contained only one woman. That woman was released by the prosecution, making an all-male jury. Defense argued that the judge in the trial had a history of venires in which women were systematically underrepresented, contrary to the law. They compared this district judge's recent venires with the venires of six other Boston area district judges.
    • 2014 January 21, Stephen Reinhardt, Circuit Judge, SmithKline Beecham Corporation, doing business as GlaxoSmithKline v. Abbott Laboratories[1], United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, archived from the original on 6 September 2015, page 2:
      During jury selection, Abbott used its first peremptory strike against the only self-identified gay member of the venire. [] This appeal's central question is whether equal protection prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation in jury selection.

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin venīre, present active infinitive of veniō ‎(come), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gʷem-.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

venire

  1. (intransitive) to come, arrive
  2. (intransitive) to be (see usage note)

Usage notesEdit

venire may be used as passive auxiliary instead of essere, but not in compound tenses

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

venīre

  1. present active infinitive of veniō

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

vēnīre

  1. present active infinitive of vēneō

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

veni +‎ -re

NounEdit

venire f ‎(plural veniri)

  1. coming, arrival, return
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