See also: comeout

English

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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come out (third-person singular simple present comes out, present participle coming out, simple past came out, past participle come out)

  1. Used other than figuratively or idiomatically: see come,‎ out.
    The mouse came out of the hole.
  2. (intransitive) To be discovered; to be revealed.
    It finally came out that he had been lying all the time.
    Her lies will eventually come out.
  3. (intransitive) To be published or released; to be issued; to be broadcast for the first time.
    My new book comes out next week.
    Her interview comes out in the next edition of the newspaper.
    The song came out on radio in 1967.
  4. (old-fashioned or historical, of a debutante) To make a formal debut in society.
    My daughter comes out in the spring.
    • 1838 (date written), L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], chapter VI, in Lady Anne Granard; or, Keeping up Appearances. [], volume I, London: Henry Colburn, [], published 1842, →OCLC, page 63:
      "You would not trouble it much, child," returned Lady Anne, pettishly; "you know you are the plain one of the family. I do not know what I shall do with you when you come out; you will have no beauty but that of youth."
    • 2024 March 18, Owen Bowcott, “Rose Dugdale obituary”, in The Guardian[1], →ISSN:
      The 1958 “coming out” season, where young women were launched into high society, was the last ceremony hosted by the monarch.
  5. (copulative) To end up or result; to turn out to be.
    There were a lot of problems at the start, but it all came out well in the end.
    The photos came out fine.
    • 1991 April 22, Jacque Ferguson, “Change Medical Care”, in Gay Community News, page 5:
      I have looked into some of the reasons why Del-Norte still lacks proper medical staff to deal with situations in here. The result of that came out to be, they don't want to spend money on things like that.
  6. (cricket, of a batsman) To walk onto the field at the beginning of an innings.
  7. (idiomatic, informal) To come out of the closet.
    He came out to his parents as gay last week.
    • 2011, Allan Bérubé, My Desire for History: Essays in Gay, Community, and Labor History:
      I had not come out yet and he was out but wasn't; quite ungay, I would say, and yet gay.
    • 2020 March 5, Yi-Ling Liu, “How a Dating App Helped a Generation of Chinese Come Out of the Closet”, in The New York Times[2], →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 2020-03-06, Feature‎[3]:
      Like many gay Chinese growing up at the turn of the millennium, Duan Shuai began his long, deliberate process of coming out online. After school, he would visit the newly opened internet cafe in his hometown, Xinzhou, a small city in Shanxi Province bounded by a veil of mountains. He would pick a desktop facing away from the wall so that nobody could look over his shoulder. Then he’d go to QQ, the new instant-messaging service and online forum, and type in the Chinese word for “homosexual” — tongzhi, or comrade.
    • 2021 August 24, Shon Faye, “‘I feel like it’s quite shaky acceptance’: trans kids and the fight for inclusion”, in The Guardian:
      In March 2017, a 90-year-old second world war veteran called Patricia Davies came out as a transgender woman and began taking hormones, shortly after discussing her lifelong gender dysphoria with her doctor.
  8. To originate in; to derive from; to be taken from out of or to have arrived from.
    That comes out of my paycheck.
    He's the best player to come out of Ohio.
  9. To express one's opinion openly.
    You had come out in favor of the French Revolution.
    I came right out and told the boss what I thought of him.
  10. (of the sun, moon or stars) To become visible in the sky as a result of clouds clearing away.
    It's quite warm now the sun has come out.
  11. To protest or go on strike, especially out of solidarity with other workers.
    We got the folks at the Detroit plant to come out too.
    We're coming out for the campaign and for all the struggling people out there.
  12. To make a debut in a new field; to start off a career or reputation.
    Here's some tips for coming out as an artist.
    • 1999, “Shanghai”, in The Book of the World, 2nd United States edition (Atlas), Macmillan, →ISBN, →LCCN, →OCLC, page 411, column 1:
      By the year 2000, Shanghai is scheduled to become an international center of commerce and finance; economic strategists predict that by 2010 the city will have become the world's largest trading center. This "secret capital" of China has set some ambitious goals for itself. The population is proudly celebrating their collective "coming out," and business is booming.
  13. (intransitive) To emerge from or reach the end of an era, event or process.
    I was coming out of a period of unemployment then.
  14. (intransitive, of a stain) To be removed.
    Red wine will help that stain come out.

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Nigerian Pidgin: komot
  • Sranan Tongo: komoto

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