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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From work +‎ shop.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

workshop (plural workshops)

  1. A room, especially one which is not particularly large, used for manufacturing or other light industrial work.
    • Charles Dickens, Barnaby Rudge
      A gleam of sun shining through the unsashed window, and chequering the dark workshop with a broad patch of light, fell full upon him, as though attracted by his sunny heart.
  2. A brief, intensive course of education for a small group, emphasizing interaction and practical problem solving.
    • 2019 July 3, Jess Schwalb, “Red Line Rebellion”, in Jewish Currents[1]:
      On any given Friday night at the Claremont Colleges, between 15 and 20 Jewish students gather to sing wordless melodies, dive into textual study of Talmud or James Baldwin, or hold workshops on antisemitism.
  3. An academic conference.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

workshop (third-person singular simple present workshops, present participle workshopping, simple past and past participle workshopped)

  1. (transitive) To help a playwright revise a draft of (a play) by rehearsing it with actors and critiquing the results.
  2. (transitive, business) To improve through collaboration.

HungarianEdit

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English workshop.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

workshop m (plural workshops)

  1. workshop (intensive course of education in a specific subject)

SynonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

workshop m (plural workshops)

  1. workshop