Last modified on 7 July 2014, at 12:49
See also: Bay, bây, bảy, and bẫy

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English baye, baie, from Old English beġ (berry), as in beġbēam (berry-tree), conflated with Old French baie, from Latin bāca (berry).

NounEdit

bay (plural bays)

  1. (obsolete) A berry.
  2. Laurus nobilis, a shrub of the family Lauraceae, having dark green leaves and berries.
  3. (in the plural, now rare) The leaves of this shrub, woven into a garland used to reward a champion or victor; hence, fame, victory.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.i:
      both you here with many a cursed oth, / Sweare she is yours, and stirre vp bloudie frayes, / To win a willow bough, whilest other weares the bayes.
  4. The leaf of this or certain other species of shrub, used as a herb.
    • Trumbull
      The patriot's honours and the poet's bays.
  5. (US, dialect) A tract covered with bay trees.
  6. A kind of mahogany obtained from Campeche in Mexico.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From French baie, from Late Latin baia.

NounEdit

bay (plural bays)

  1. (geography) A body of water (especially the sea) more or less three-quarters surrounded by land.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      'Twas early June, the new grass was flourishing everywheres, the posies in the yard—peonies and such—in full bloom, the sun was shining, and the water of the bay was blue, with light green streaks where the shoal showed.
  2. A bank or dam to keep back water.
SynonymsEdit
  • (body of water): gulf
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From French baie, from Old French baé, masculine singular past participle of the verb baer, from Vulgar Latin *badō (I am open).

NounEdit

bay (plural bays)

  1. An opening in a wall, especially between two columns.
  2. An internal recess; a compartment or area surrounded on three sides.
    • 2013 June 1, “Ideas coming down the track”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8838, page 13 (Technology Quarterly): 
      A “moving platform” scheme [] is more technologically ambitious than maglev trains even though it relies on conventional rails. Local trains would use side-by-side rails to roll alongside intercity trains and allow passengers to switch trains by stepping through docking bays.
  3. The distance between two supports in a vault or building with a pitched roof.
  4. (nautical) Each of the spaces, port and starboard, between decks, forward of the bitts, in sailing warships.
  5. (rail transport) A bay platform.
  6. Shortened form of bay window.
TranslationsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From Old French bay, combined with aphesized form of abay; verbal form Old French baier, abaier.

NounEdit

bay (plural bays)

  1. The excited howling of dogs when hunting or being attacked.
  2. (by extension) The climactic confrontation between hunting-dogs and their prey.
  3. (figuratively) A state of being obliged to face an antagonist or a difficulty, when escape has become impossible.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Dryden
      Embolden'd by despair, he stood at bay.
    • (Can we date this quote?) I. Taylor
      The most terrible evils are just kept at bay by incessant efforts.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

bay (third-person singular simple present bays, present participle baying, simple past and past participle bayed)

  1. (intransitive) To howl.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Dryden
      The hounds at nearer distance hoarsely bayed.
  2. (transitive) To bark at; hence, to follow with barking; to bring or drive to bay.
    to bay the bear
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  3. (transitive) To pursue noisily, like a pack of hounds.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 5Edit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

BayMare.jpg

From French baie, from Latin badius (reddish brown, chestnut).

AdjectiveEdit

bay (comparative more bay, superlative most bay)

  1. Of a reddish-brown colour (especially of horses).
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

bay (uncountable)

  1. A brown colour/color of the coat of some horses.
    bay colour:    
  2. A horse of this color.
QuotationsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CornishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bay m (plural bayow)

  1. kiss

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


Crimean TatarEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bay

  1. rich

DeclensionEdit


Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

VerbEdit

bay

  1. to give

SynonymsEdit


TurkishEdit

NounEdit

bay (definite accusative [[{{{1}}}#Turkish|{{{1}}}]], plural [[{{{2}}}#Turkish|{{{2}}}]])

  1. sir

VietnameseEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): /ˀɓɐj˧˧/
  • (Huế) IPA(key): /ˀɓɐj˧˧/
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): /ˀɓɐj˧˥/

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Mon-Khmer *par

VerbEdit

bay

  1. to fly (travel through the air)
  2. to flutter (flap or wave quickly but irregularly)
  3. to fly (travel very fast)
  4. to fade away

AdverbEdit

bay

  1. with ease; in a fast-paced manner
    cãi bay
    to snap at each other

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

bay

  1. trowel

Etymology 3Edit

PronounEdit

bay

  1. (condescending or very informal) you
SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit