EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Old English līm, from Proto-Germanic *līmaz. Cognate with Danish lim (from Old Norse lím), Dutch lijm, German Leim; Latin limus (mud).

NounEdit

lime (countable and uncountable, plural limes)

  1. (chemistry) A general term for inorganic materials containing calcium, usually calcium oxide or calcium hydroxide; quicklime.
    • 1952, L.F. Salzman, Building in England, page 149.
      Lime, which is the product of the burning of chalk or limestone, might be bought ready burnt, or it could be burnt in kilns specially constructed in the neighbourhood of the building operations.
  2. (poetic) Any gluey or adhesive substance; something which traps or captures someone; sometimes a synonym for birdlime.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by William Shakespeare, act 4 scene 1
      Monster, come, put some lime upon your fingers, and away with the rest.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Wordsworth
      Like the lime that foolish birds are caught with.
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

lime (third-person singular simple present limes, present participle liming, simple past and past participle limed)

  1. (transitive) To treat with calcium hydroxide or calcium oxide (lime).
  2. (transitive) To smear with birdlime.
    1. (rare) To ensnare, catch, entrap.
  3. (transitive) To apply limewash
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Avenue of limes (Tilia) in Prague.

An alteration of line, a variant form of lind.

NounEdit

lime (plural limes)

  1. A deciduous tree of the genus Tilia, especially Tilia × europaea; the linden tree, or its wood.
    • 1871–72, George Eliot, Middlemarch, Chapter 3
      she looked before her, not consciously seeing, but absorbing into the intensity of her mood, the solemn glory of the afternoon with its long swathes of light between the far-off rows of limes, whose shadows touched each other.
Related termsEdit
Usage notesEdit
  • Both this and the citrus are trees with fragrant flowers, but this is more temperate and the citrus is more tropical and subtropical. Outside of Europe and adjoining parts of Asia, the citrus sense is much more common
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Avocados and limes.

From French lime, from Spanish lima, from Arabic ليمة (līma).

NounEdit

lime (plural limes)

  1. A green citrus fruit, somewhat smaller and sharper-tasting than a lemon.
  2. Any of the trees that bear limes, especially Citrus aurantiifolia.
  3. A light, somewhat yellowish, green colour associated with the fruits of a lime tree.
    lime colour:    
    web lime colour:    
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit
Usage notesEdit
  • Both this and the linden are trees with fragrant flowers, but the linden is more temperate and this is more tropical and subtropical. Outside of Europe and adjoining parts of Asia, this sense is much more common
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

AdjectiveEdit

lime (not comparable)

  1. Containing lime or lime juice.
  2. Having the aroma or flavor of lime.
  3. Lime-green.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Back-formation from limer.

VerbEdit

lime (third-person singular simple present limes, present participle liming, simple past and past participle limed)

  1. (West Indies) To hang out/socialize in an informal, relaxed environment, especially with friends, for example at a party or on the beach.

Etymology 5Edit

From lime (the fruit) as comparable to lemon (a more explicit rating in anime).

NounEdit

lime (plural limes)

  1. (anime) A fan fiction story that stops short of full, explicit descriptions of sexual activity; a story characterized by PG-13 level explicitness; or one that approaches an intimate scene, and then goes "off-camera", with the intimacy left to the reader's imagination.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

lime c (singular definite limen, plural indefinite lime or limes)

  1. lime (fruit)

InflectionEdit

VerbEdit

lime (imperative lim, infinitive at lime, present tense limer, past tense limede, past participle har limet)

  1. to glue

FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlime/
  • Hyphenation: li‧me

NounEdit

lime

  1. lime (citrus fruit and its fruit)

DeclensionEdit

Usage notesEdit

This word is regarded as incorrect by many. Some inflected forms are indeed quite awkward to use.

SynonymsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin līma.

NounEdit

lime f (plural limes)

  1. file (tool)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Spanish lima, from Arabic ليمة (līma).

NounEdit

lime f (plural limes)

  1. lime (fruit, tree)
SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

lime

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of limar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of limar

ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

lime f

  1. plural form of lima

Etymology 2Edit

From English

NounEdit

lime m (invariable)

  1. lime (citrus tree)

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

līme

  1. vocative singular of līmus

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

lime

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of limar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of limar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of limar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of limar.
Last modified on 2 April 2014, at 04:01