See also: hẽm

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

A sound uttered in imitation of clearing the throat (onomatopoeia)

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

hem!

  1. Used to fill in the gap of a pause with a vocalized sound.

See alsoEdit

NounEdit

hem (plural hems)

  1. An utterance or sound of the voice like "hem", often indicative of hesitation or doubt, sometimes used to call attention.
    • Spectator
      his morning hems

VerbEdit

hem (third-person singular simple present hems, present participle hemming, simple past and past participle hemmed)

  1. To make the sound expressed by the word hem; to hesitate in speaking.
    • Shakespeare
      Hem, and stroke thy beard.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English hem, hemm, in turn from Old English hemm and related to Middle High German hemmen (to hem in), Old Norse hemja (to hem in, restrain). The Proto-Indo-European root gave rise also to Armenian քամել (kʿamel, to press, wring) and Russian ком (kom, lump).

NounEdit

A stitched hem.
Drawing of a sheet metal hem.

hem (plural hems)

  1. (sewing) The border of an article of clothing doubled back and stitched together to finish the edge and prevent it from fraying.
  2. A rim or margin of something.
    • Shakespeare
      hem of the sea
  3. In sheet metal design, a rim or edge folded back on itself to create a smooth edge and to increase strength or rigidity.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

hem (third-person singular simple present hems, present participle hemming, simple past and past participle hemmed)

  1. (intransitive) (in sewing) To make a hem.
  2. (transitive): To put hem on an article of clothing, to edge or put a border on something.
  3. (transitive): To surround something or someone in a confining way.
TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Old English him, heom, originally a dative plural form but in Middle English coming to serve as an accusative plural as well.

PronounEdit

hem

  1. Obsolete form of 'em.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

hem

  1. First-person plural present indicative form of haver.

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch hem, from Old Dutch himo, from Proto-Germanic *himmai.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

hem

  1. (personal) Third-person singular, masculine, objective: him.
    Stuur dat maar naar hem. — Send that to him.

DeclensionEdit



KurdishEdit

ConjunctionEdit

hem

  1. and

See alsoEdit

  • herwiha
  • û

LatinEdit

InterjectionEdit

hem!

  1. eh?, well well! (expressing surprise)

Related termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

PronounEdit

hem

  1. them
    • 1407, The Testimony of William Thorpe, pages 40–41
      And I seide, “Ser, in his tyme maister Ioon Wiclef was holden of ful many men the grettis clerk that thei knewen lyuynge vpon erthe. And therwith he was named, as I gesse worthili, a passing reuli man and an innocent in al his lyuynge. And herfore grete men of kunnynge and other also drowen myche to him, and comownede ofte with him. And thei sauouriden so his loore that thei wroten it bisili and enforsiden hem to rulen hem theraftir… Maister Ion Aston taughte and wroot acordingli and ful bisili, where and whanne and to whom he myghte, and he vsid it himsilf, I gesse, right perfyghtli vnto his lyues eende. Also Filip of Repintoun whilis he was a chanoun of Leycetre, Nycol Herforde, dane Geffrey of Pikeringe, monke of Biland and a maistir dyuynyte, and Ioon Purueye, and manye other whiche weren holden rightwise men and prudent, taughten and wroten bisili this forseide lore of Wiclef, and conformeden hem therto. And with alle these men I was ofte homli and I comownede with hem long tyme and fele, and so bifore alle othir men I chees wilfulli to be enformed bi hem and of hem, and speciali of Wiclef himsilf, as of the moost vertuous and goodlich wise man that I herde of owhere either knew. And herfore of Wicleef speciali and of these men I toke the lore whiche I haue taughte and purpose to lyue aftir, if God wole, to my lyues ende.”
    • 1930, Mickey Mouse newspaper comic
      I wonder how far old Shyster and Peg-Leg Pete are now? Do you think we'll ever be able to overtake hem?

DescendantsEdit


PijinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

English him

PronounEdit

hem

  1. he/she/it (third-person singular pronoun)
    • 1988, Geoffrey Miles White, Bikfala faet: olketa Solomon Aelanda rimembarem Wol Wo Tu[1], page 75:
      Bihaen hemi finisim skul blong hem, hemi go minista long sios long ples blong hem long 'Areo.

See alsoEdit


This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. This language is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

PortugueseEdit

InterjectionEdit

hem

  1. Rare form of hein.

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse heim < heimr, from Proto-Germanic *haimaz.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

hem

  1. home; to one's home
    Det är dags att gå hem.
    It is time to go home.

NounEdit

hem n

  1. a home; one's dwelling place, as in a house or a more general geographical place; the abiding place of the affections.
  2. a home; an institution

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

  • barndomshem
  • barnhem
  • fosterhem
  • fritidshem
  • föräldrahem
  • gästhem
  • hemadress
  • hemarbetande
  • hemarbete
  • hembageri
  • hembakad
  • hembakt
  • hembesök
  • hembio
  • hembiträde
  • hembjuda
  • hembrygd
  • hembryggd
  • hembränd
  • hembrännare
  • hembränning
  • hembränt
  • hembud
  • hemby
  • hembygd
  • hembyggd
  • hembygge
  • hembära
  • hembärning
  • hemdator
  • hemdragande
  • hemelektronik
  • hemfalla
  • hemflyttad
  • hemflyttning
  • hemforsla
  • hemforsling
  • hemfrakt
  • hemfrakta
  • hemfraktning
  • hemfrid
  • hemfärd
  • hemföra
  • hemförhållanden
  • hemföring
  • hemförlossning
  • hemförlova
  • hemförlovning
  • hemförsamling
  • hemförskaffa
  • hemförsäkring
  • hemförsäljning
  • hemgift
  • hemgjord
  • hemgående
  • hemgång
  • hemgången
  • hemhjälp
  • hemhjälpare
  • hemhörighet
  • hemifrån
  • hemikring
  • heminredare
  • heminredning
  • hemkalla
  • hemkallelse
  • hemkallning
  • hemkatalog
  • hemknutar
  • hemkokt
  • hemkommen
  • hemkommun
  • hemkomst
  • hemkonsulent
  • hemkunskap
  • hemkänsla
  • hemkär
  • hemkärlek
  • hemköp
  • hemköra
  • hemkörd
  • hemkörning
  • hemkört
  • hemlagad
  • hemland
  • hemlandskap
  • hemlig
  • hemligen
  • hemlighet
  • hemlik
  • hemlis
  • hemliv
  • hemlov
  • hemlån
  • hemlånad
  • hemlåning
  • hemlän
  • hemlängtan
  • hemläxa
  • hemlös
  • hemlöshet
  • hemma
  • hemman
  • hemmarsch
  • hemmiljö
  • hemnummer
  • hemom
  • hemomkring
  • hemort
  • hempermanent
  • hempermission
  • hempermittera
  • hempermittering
  • hemresa
  • hemsamarit
  • hemservice
  • hemsida
  • hemsjukvård
  • hemskicka
  • hemskickning
  • hemskild
  • hemskillnad
  • hemskydd
  • hemsläpa
  • hemslöjd
  • hemsnickrad
  • hemsocken
  • hemspråk
  • hemspunnen
  • hemstad
  • hemstickad
  • hemställa
  • hemställan
  • hemstöpt
  • hemsydd
  • hemsyssla
  • hemsända
  • hemsändning
  • hemsöka
  • hemsökelse
  • hemsömmerska
  • hemsömnad
  • hemtagning
  • hemtal
  • hemtam
  • hemteknisk
  • hemterminal
  • hemtextil
  • hemtextilier
  • hemtjänst
  • hemtrakt
  • hemtransport
  • hemtransportera
  • hemtrevlig
  • hemtrevnad
  • hemundervisning
  • hemuppgift
  • hemvan
  • hemvist
  • hemvård
  • hemvårdare
  • hemvårdarinna
  • hemväg
  • hemvända
  • hemvärn
  • hemvävd
  • hemåt
  • hemåtvändande
  • sjukhem
  • skolhem
  • soldathem
  • vandrarhem
  • ålderdomshem

ReferencesEdit


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Persian هم (ham).

AdverbEdit

hem

  1. and also
Last modified on 11 April 2014, at 00:44