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ChineseEdit

 
rich; abundant; to enrich; resource
scholar; warrior; knight
simp. and trad.
(富士)
 
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EtymologyEdit

Orthographic borrowing from Japanese 富士 (Fuji).

PronunciationEdit


Proper nounEdit

富士

  1. (~山) Mount Fuji (a mountain, the highest mountain in Japan)
  2. () Fuji (a city in Shizuoka, Japan)
  3. Fuji, a Japanese company

JapaneseEdit

Kanji in this term

Grade: 5

Grade: 4
goon
ateji (当て字)

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

⟨puzi⟩/ɸuʑi//fuʑi/

From Old Japanese 富士 (Puzi).

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

富士 (hiragana ふじ, rōmaji Fuji)

  1. Short for 富士山 (Fujisan): Mount Fuji
    • 905914, Kokin Wakashū (book 11, poem 534)
       (ひと) ()れぬ (おも)ひをつねにするがなる () () (やま)こそ () ()なりけれ
      hito shirenu omoi o tsune ni Suruga naru Fuji-no-yama koso waga mi narikere
      (please add an English translation of this example)
    • For more examples of usage of this term, see Citations:富士.
  2. a placename, especially of a city in Shizuoka Prefecture
  3. a surname

CitationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:富士.

Derived termsEdit

ProverbsEdit

DescendantsEdit

NounEdit

富士 (hiragana ふじ, rōmaji fuji)

  1. Short for 江戸富士 (Edo no Fuji): a hill imitating Mount Fuji
  2. an incense made of 伽羅 (kyara) aromatic wood
  3. (euphemistic) female genitalia
    Synonym: 女陰 (join)

Old JapaneseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested in the Hitachi-no-kuni Fudoki (c. 717–724 CE).

Etymology continues to be debated, theories include:

This kanji spelling first appeared in a variant of the Suruga-no-kuni Fudoki and in the Shoku Nihongi (797 CE), possibly relating to a folk etymology of (fu, abundant) + (shi, soldiers) climbing the mountain. Multiple other folk etymologies exist, such as 不死 (fushi, immortal). All the folk etymologies rely on on'yomi readings, a trait that Vovin finds unsatisfactory due to the reliance on Chinese morphemes to spell an ancient Japanese placename.

Proper nounEdit

富士 (Puzi) (kana ふじ)

  1. Short for 富士 (Puzi-no2-yama): Mount Fuji
    • c. 717–724, Hitachi-no-kuni Fudoki (Tsukuba)
      神祖尊、巡行諸神之処、到駿河國福慈岳...
      (please add an English translation of this usage example)
    • c. 759, Man'yōshū (book 11, poem 2695), text here
      吾妹子尓相縁乎無駿河不盡乃高嶺之焼管香將有
      wagi1moko1 ni apu yo2si wo nami1 Suruga naru Puzi no2 takane no2 moyetutu ka aramu
      With no way now for me to meet my love, my heart is burning with the thought of love like the fire on the top of Mount Fuji in Suruga.[4]
    • c. 759, Man'yōshū (book 14, poem 3355, first variant), text here
      安麻乃波良不自能之婆夜麻己能久礼能等伎由都利奈波阿波受可母安良牟
      ama no2 para Puzi no2 sibayama ko2no2 kure no2 to2ki1 yuturinaba apazu ka mo aramu
      Under the shade of the trees, on the grassy mount[sic] Fuji, field of the heavens, if too much time passes, [I] may not be able to meet [you].[5]
    • For more examples of usage of this term, see Citations:富士.

CitationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:富士.

DescendantsEdit

  • Japanese: 富士 (ふじ, Fuji)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ John Batchelor (1925) The Pit-dwellers of Hokkaido and Ainu Place-names Considered, Sapporo, page 10
  2. ^ c. 759, Man'yōshū (book 20, poem 4419), text here
  3. ^ Alexander Vovin and William McClure, editors (2017) Studies in Japanese and Korean Historical Linguistics and Beyond, Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, pages 80-89: “On The Etymology of the Name of Mt. Fuji”
  4. ^ Kazuha Tashiro (2017), “Mount Fuji and waka poetry”, in Yoshinori Yasuda, Mark J. Hudson, editors, Multidisciplinary Studies of the Environment and Civilization: Japanese Perspectives (Routledge Studies on Asia and the Anthropocene), Routledge, →ISBN
  5. ^ Matthew Zisk ((Can we date this quote?)) Three types of semantic influence from Chinese through kundoku glossing on the Japanese language[1]

VietnameseEdit

Hán tự in this term

Proper nounEdit

富士

  1. Hán tự form of Phú Sĩ (Mount Fuji (a mountain, the highest mountain in Japan)).
  2. Hán tự form of Phú Sĩ (Fuji (a city in Shizuoka, Japan)).