â U+00E2, â
LATIN SMALL LETTER A WITH CIRCUMFLEX
Composition:a [U+0061] + ◌̂ [U+0302]
á
[U+00E1]
Latin-1 Supplement ã
[U+00E3]

English

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Symbol

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â

  1. (lexicography) An element of the digraph âr, a dictionary transcription for the SQUARE vowel

Albanian

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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â

  1. Gheg form of është

French

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Letter

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â (lower case, upper case Â)

  1. the letter a with circumflex, used in French spelling, representing the phoneme /ɑ/

Jarai

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Pronunciation

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Letter

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â (upper case Â)

  1. The third letter of the Jarai alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Jersey Dutch

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Pronunciation

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Letter

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â

  1. A letter of the Jersey Dutch alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Namuyi

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Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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â

  1. we

Synonyms

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Neapolitan

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Etymology

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Compare Italian alla.

Contraction

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â (used with feminine singular nouns)

  1. Contraction of a 'a (to the).
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Portuguese

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Etymology

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The letter a with a circumflex.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ɐ/, [ɐ], [ɜ], [ə]
  • (preceding coda ‘n’ or ‘m’) IPA(key): /ɐ̃/, [ɐ̃], [ɜ̃], [ə̃]
  • Always stressed.

Letter

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â

  1. a letter "a" which is stressed and close

Contraction

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â

  1. Obsolete spelling of à.

Romanian

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Pronunciation

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Letter

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â (lower case, upper case Â)

  1. The third letter of the Romanian alphabet, called î or î din a and written in the Latin script.

Usage notes

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  • See the usage notes at Â.

See also

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Sicilian

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Article

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â f sg (plural î)

  1. (definite article, spoken only) the, colloquial form of la

Preposition

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â

  1. Contraction of a la (to the).

See also

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Sicilian articles
Masculine Feminine
indefinite singular un, nu na
definite singular lu, û la, â
definite plural li, î li, î

Skolt Sami

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Pronunciation

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Letter

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â (upper case Â)

  1. The second letter of the Skolt Sami alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also

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Turkish

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Letter

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â (lower case, upper case Â)

  1. The letter of the Turkish alphabet, called â and written in the Latin script.

Usage notes

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Not specified in the alphabet, but used officially to mark the palatalized consonant in the same syllable or distinguish long vowels if long vowel is distinguishing factor.

kâr/cɑɾ/, gâvur/ɟɑˈvuɾ/
adet (amount)/ɑˈdet/, âdet (tradition)/ɑːˈdet/

See also

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Vietnamese

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Pronunciation

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Letter

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â (lower case, upper case Â)

  1. The third letter of the Vietnamese alphabet, called and written in the Latin script.

See also

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Walloon

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Pronunciation

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Letter

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â (upper case Â)

  1. A letter of the Walloon alphabet, written in the Latin script..

Welsh

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Etymology 1

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In origin a specialised prepositional use of a (and).[1] (The distinction in spelling and pronunciation between the two prevocalic forms ag and ac is artificial.)

Alternative forms

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  • ag (used before vowels)

Pronunciation

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The circumflex is used to distinguish the word from a (and) rather than to indicate vowel length.

Preposition

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â

  1. with
  2. (instrumental) with, by means of
Usage notes
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  • In formal language, â triggers the aspirate mutation, but colloquially this is usually absent unless in certain set phrases. Before vowels, ag is used instead, but often it remains â colloquially.
  • In the colloquial language â meaning “with” is mostly used after specific verbs, such as cwrdd (meet) or ymweld (visit). The synonyms gyda or efo are used more generally.
  • Note especially the forms mynd â (take, literally go with) and dod â (bring, literally come with). Compare:
    • Es i â fy mam at y meddyg.I took my mother to the doctor. [I transported her]
    • Es i gyda fy mam at y meddyg.I went with my mother to the doctor. [she accompanied me]
Inflection
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No personal inflections.

See also
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Conjunction

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â

  1. as (in equative constructions mor...â, cyn...â)
    mor hen â phechod ei hunas old as sin itself
Usage notes
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  • In formal language, â triggers the aspirate mutation, but colloquially this is usually absent unless in certain set phrases. Before vowels, ag is used instead, but it often remains â colloquially.
See also
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  • fel (as, like)

Etymology 2

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Proto-Celtic *ageti

Pronunciation

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Verb

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â

  1. (literary) third-person singular present indicative/future of mynd
Synonyms
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Etymology 3

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Pronunciation

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Letter

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â (upper case Â)

  1. The letter A, marked for its long stressed pronunciation, either in a monosyllabic word or in the final syllable of a polysyllabic word.

References

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  1. ^ R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “â”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Xavante

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Noun

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â

  1. Alternative spelling of ö (Protestant spelling)