See also: nik, Nik, and -ník

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From the Slavic suffix (Russian: -ник(-nik)). This suffix experienced a surge in English coinages for nicknames and diminutives after the 1957 Soviet launch of the first Sputnik satellite. English usage is heavily influenced by Yiddish usage of ־ניק(-nik) and similar borrowed words (nogoodnik, nudnik, kibbutznik).

SuffixEdit

-nik

  1. Appended to words to create a nickname for a person who exemplifies, endorses, or is associated with the thing or quality specified (by the base form), often a particular ideology or preference.

Derived termsEdit


External linksEdit

  • 1990 Autumn, Kabakchi, V. V.; Doyle, Charles Clay, “Of Sputniks, Beatniks, and Nogoodniks”, in American Speech[1], volume 65, number 3, JSTOR 455919, pages 275-278:

EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Compare Latvian -nieks and Russian -ник(-nik).

SuffixEdit

-nik ‎(genitive -niku, partitive -nikku)

  1. Forms occupational agent nouns. (non-productive)
    kiri "text" → kirjanik "writer"
    aed "garden" → aednik "gardener"
    kunst "art" → kunstnik "artist"

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit




OjibweEdit

SuffixEdit

-nik ‎(plural -nikan)

  1. arm
    ingodonikone arm; one armlength
    midaasonikten arms; ten armlengths
    jiiskinikebizonbracelet; garter
    minikeyaabarmband; bracelet
    ninikmy arm
    gichinikright hand

Related termsEdit


PolishEdit

SuffixEdit

-nik m

  1. Forms masculine nouns referring to a performer of some action, sometimes a device; -er

DeclensionEdit

Personal nouns:

Impersonal nouns:

Derived termsEdit


Related termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *-(ь)nikъ, itself originally by nominalization of adjectives in *-ьnъ with the suffix *-ikъ (whence -ik). The suffix originates from Proto-Balto-Slavic period; compare with dialectal Lithuanian lauk-inykas(peasant, farmer) (from laũkas(field)) and Old Prussian lauk-inikis(vassal).

SuffixEdit

-nik ‎(Cyrillic spelling -ник)

  1. Suffix appended to nominal stems to create a masculine noun, usually denoting a profession, performer, place, object, tool or a feature.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Skok, Petar (1971) Etimologijski rječnik hrvatskoga ili srpskoga jezika (in Serbo-Croatian), volume I, Zagreb: JAZU, page 515