adopt

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French adopter, from Latin adoptare; ad + optare (to choose, desire).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

adopt (third-person singular simple present adopts, present participle adopting, simple past and past participle adopted)

  1. (transitive, with relationship specified) To take by choice into relationship, as, child, heir, friend, citizen, etc.
  2. (transitive, with relationship implied by context) To take voluntarily (a child of other parents) to be in the place of, or as, one's own child.
    A friend of mine recently adopted a Chinese baby girl found on the streets of Beijing.
  3. (transitive, with relationship implied by context) To obtain (a pet) from a shelter or the wild.
    We're going to adopt a Dalmatian.
  4. (transitive, with relationship implied by context) To take by choice into the scope of one's responsibility.
    This supermarket chain adopts several families every Yuletide, providing them with money and groceries for the holidays.
  5. (transitive) To take or receive as one's own what is not so naturally.
  6. (transitive) To select and take or approve.
    to adopt the view or policy of another
    These resolutions were adopted.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Related termsEdit

Last modified on 6 April 2014, at 07:41