See also: ARS, ARs, árs, ārs, and års

Contents

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

ars

  1. plural of ar

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See ar ‎(scar).

NounEdit

ars n

  1. genitive singular indefinite of ar
  2. genitive plural indefinite of ar

Etymology 2Edit

See ar ‎(are).

NounEdit

ars c

  1. genitive singular indefinite of ar
  2. genitive plural indefinite of ar

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *h₂r̥tís ‎(fitting), from the root *h₂er- ‎(to join). Cognates include Avestan [script needed] ‎(arəiti-, reward) and Ancient Greek ἄρτι ‎(árti, just, exactly). Related to arma.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ars f ‎(genitive artis); third declension

  1. art, skill
  2. craft, power

InflectionEdit

Third declension i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
nominative ars artēs
genitive artis artium
dative artī artibus
accusative artem artēs
ablative arte artibus
vocative ars artēs

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ars in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ars in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • abstruse studies: studia, quae in reconditis artibus versantur (De Or. 1. 2. 8)
    • (ambiguous) to have received a liberal education: optimis studiis or artibus, optimarum artium studiis eruditum esse
    • to teach some one letters: erudire aliquem artibus, litteris (but erudire aliquem in iure civili, in re militari)
    • system: ratio; disciplina, ratio et disciplina; ars
    • (ambiguous) the rules of art; aesthetics: artis praecepta, or also simply ars
    • to have no taste for the fine arts: abhorrere ab artibus (opp. delectari artibus)
    • the art of painting: ars pingendi, pictura (De Or. 2. 16. 69)
    • the art of sculpture: ars fingendi
    • the dramatic art: ars ludicra (De Or. 2. 20. 84)
    • the art of speaking; oratory: ars dicendi
    • to fool a person thoroughly: omnibus artibus aliquem ludificari, eludere
    • (ambiguous) to sleep soundly (from fatigue): arte, graviter dormire (ex lassitudine)
    • (ambiguous) to reduce a thing to its theoretical principles; to apply theory to a thing: ad artem, ad rationem revocare aliquid (De Or. 2. 11. 44)
    • (ambiguous) learning, scientific knowledge is flourishing: artium studia or artes vigent (not florent)
    • (ambiguous) to be interested in, have a taste for culture: optimarum artium studio incensum esse
    • (ambiguous) to have received a liberal education: optimis studiis or artibus, optimarum artium studiis eruditum esse
    • (ambiguous) to know nothing of logic: disserendi artem nullam habere
    • (ambiguous) theoretical, speculative philosophy: philosophia, quae in rerum contemplatione versatur, or quae artis praeceptis continetur
    • (ambiguous) to systematise: ad artem redigere aliquid
    • (ambiguous) to systematise: ad rationem, ad artem et praecepta revocare aliquid (De Or. 1. 41)
    • (ambiguous) to have been reduced to a system: arte conclusum esse
    • (ambiguous) to be very intimately related: arte (artissime) coniunctum esse
    • (ambiguous) a work of art: artis opus; opus arte factum or perfectum
    • (ambiguous) to follow an artistic profession, practise an art: artem exercere
    • (ambiguous) to teach an art: artem tradere, docere
    • (ambiguous) to profess an art: artem profiteri
    • (ambiguous) a taste for the fine arts: artium (liberalium) studium, or simply studium
    • (ambiguous) the rules of art; aesthetics: artis praecepta, or also simply ars
    • (ambiguous) a connoisseur; a specialist: (artis, artium) intellegens, peritus (opp. idiota, a layman)
    • (ambiguous) to learn, study music: artem musicam discere, tractare
    • (ambiguous) to be very eloquent: dicendi arte florere
    • (ambiguous) to reduce law to a system: ius ad artem redigere
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 55

LatvianEdit

VerbEdit

ars

  1. 3rd person singular future indicative form of art
  2. 3rd person plural future indicative form of art

Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

ars m ‎(masculine plural ars, feminine singular arse, feminine plural arses)

  1. oblique masculine singular participle of ardeir
  2. nominative masculine singular participle of ardeir
  3. oblique masculine plural past participle of ardeir
  4. nominative masculine plural past participle of ardeir

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *arsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃érsos, *ors-. Cognate with Old English ærs, ears (Modern English arse), Old High German ars (German Arsch), Old Norse ars, rass, and more distantly with Old Armenian ոռ ‎(oṙ, ass), and (Modern) Greek ουρά ‎(ourá, tail).

NounEdit

ars m

  1. the arse; the buttocks or anus

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Low German: ars
    • Low German: ars, ors; by contraction from forms of at the arse (am/an'n ars): nors, mors

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ārsus, past participle of ārdeō. Compare Italian arso, Aromanian arsu.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ars

  1. past participle of arde

AdjectiveEdit

ars

  1. burnt
  2. scorched, parched

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

ars

  1. indefinite genitive singular of ar
  2. indefinite genitive plural of ar
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