EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English baffen (to bark). Cognate with Dutch baffen (to bark), Low German baffen (to bark), German baffen, bäfzen (to bark), Danish bjæffe (to yelp), Swedish bjäbba (to yelp, bark). Compare buff, yaff.

VerbEdit

baff (third-person singular simple present baffs, present participle baffing, simple past and past participle baffed)

  1. (intransitive, archaic) To bark; yelp.

Etymology 2Edit

Probably from Old French baffe (slap in the face) (French baffe), of imitative origin.

VerbEdit

baff (third-person singular simple present baffs, present participle baffing, simple past and past participle baffed)

  1. To hit or strike, especially with something flat or soft.
  2. (golf) To strike the ground with the bottom of the club when taking a stroke.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

NounEdit

baff (uncountable)

  1. (Geordie) blank

ReferencesEdit

  • The New Geordie Dictionary, Frank Graham, 1987, ISBN 0946928118
  • Northumberland Words, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4[1]
Last modified on 16 June 2013, at 22:59