See also: Beau and beau-

English edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French beau, from Latin bellus (beautiful). Doublet of bello.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

beau (plural beaux or beaus)

  1. (dated) A man with a reputation for fine dress and etiquette; a dandy or fop.
    Coordinate term: belle
    • 1811, [Jane Austen], chapter XXI, in Sense and Sensibility [], volume I, London: [] C[harles] Roworth, [], and published by T[homas] Egerton, [], →OCLC, page 290:
      []—I suppose your brother was quite a beau, Miss Dashwood, before he married, as he was so rich?”
      “Upon my word,” replied Elinor, “I cannot tell you, for I do not perfectly comprehend the meaning of the word. But this I can say, that if he ever was a beau before he married, he is one still, for there is not the smallest alteration in him.”
      “Oh! dear! one never thinks of married men’s being beaux—they have something else to do.”
    • 1824, Cut and Come again [pseudonym], “On Cutting”, in Tobias Merton [pseudonym; Samuel Egerton Brydges and Egerton Anthony Brydges], editor, The Literary Magnet of the Belles Lettres, Science, and the Fine Arts: [], volume II, London: William Charlton Wright, [], page 19:
      [H]e could not but turn with ineffable contempt to the tawdry beaus and belles from the city, who presumed to mingle in the fashionable gala.
  2. (dated) A male lover; a boyfriend.
    • 1917, Kate Douglas Wiggin, Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, page 142:
      Hannah's beau takes all her time 'n' thought, and when she gits a husband her mother'll be out o' sight and out o' mind.
    • 1923, Lucy Maud Montgomery, “Chapter 8”, in Emily of New Moon:
      “I don’t see how. But anyhow, you’ll be rich some day—your Aunt Elizabeth will likely leave you all her money, Mother says. So I don’t care if you are living on charity—I love you and I’m going to stick up for you. Have you got a beau, Emily?”
      “No,” cried Emily, blushing violently and quite scandalized at the idea. “Why, I’m only eleven.”
    • 2009 December 10, Philippa Bourke, Monsters and Critics[1]:
      Kristin Davis has taken time out to enjoy the surf and sand with her Australian beau, photographer Russell James.
    • 2012 October 24, Jon Caramanica, “No More Kid Stuff for Taylor Swift”, in The New York Times[2], →ISSN:
      Reporters ask her about her love life—her current beau is rumored to be Conor Kennedy, a grandson of Robert F. Kennedy—even if they get nowhere.
  3. A male escort.
  4. A suitor of a lady.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

Verb edit

beau (third-person singular simple present beaus, present participle beauing, simple past and past participle beaued)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To act as a beau (towards); to court or woo.
    • 2013, Philipp Meyer, The Son, Simon & Schuster, published 2014, page 74:
      Everyone was feeling grandacious, as if getting dressed for a night of beauing.

See also edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Aromanian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin bibō. Compare Romanian bea, beau.

Verb edit

beau first-singular present indicative (third-person singular present indicative bea, past participle biutã)

  1. to drink

Related terms edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle French beau, from Old French biau, bel, from Latin bellus.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

beau (masculine singular before vowel bel, feminine belle, masculine plural beaux, feminine plural belles)

  1. handsome, fine, attractive
  2. nice
  3. fair (weather)
    Il fait beau.
    It is nice out.

Usage notes edit

  • To avoid hiatus, the form bel is used before masculine singular nouns that begin with a vowel or mute h.

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • English: beau, Beau, belle, Belle

Noun edit

beau m (plural beaux)

  1. (Louisiana) boyfriend

Coordinate terms edit

Adverb edit

beau

  1. in vain
    J’ai beau trimé
    No matter how hard I try / Try as I might

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French bel, biau, from Latin bellus, from Old Latin *duenelos. Doublet of bel.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

beau

  1. good, fine

References edit

Middle French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French beau, one of the variants of biau.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

beau m (feminine singular belle, masculine plural beaux, feminine plural belles)

  1. beautiful; handsome; attractive

Descendants edit

Old French edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

beau m (oblique and nominative feminine singular bele)

  1. Alternative form of biau
    • c. 1190, Marie de France, Lai de Isclavret:
      beaus chevalers e bons esteit
      e noblement se cunteneit.
      Hansome knight and good was he
      and he behaved nobly.

Declension edit

Romanian edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

beau

  1. inflection of bea:
    1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. third-person plural present/imperfect indicative