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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French baud. Named for French inventor Jean-Maurice-Émile Baudot (1845-1903).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

baud (countable and uncountable, plural bauds)

  1. (computing, telecommunications) A rate defined as the number of signalling events per second in a data transmission.
  2. (computing, informal) bps (bits per second), regardless of how many signalling events are necessary to signal each bit.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

NounEdit

baud m

  1. baud (unit of rate of data transmission)

Further readingEdit


DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vōx, vocem, possibly influenced by vōtum.

NounEdit

baud f

  1. voice

Dibabawon ManoboEdit

NounEdit

baud

  1. pigeon

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French bald (joyous, full of ardor), from Frankish *bald, *balt, from Proto-Germanic *balþaz (strong, bold) (compare English bold, Dutch boud).

NounEdit

baud m (plural bauds)

  1. A type of hunting dog

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English baud. Named for French inventor Jean-Maurice-Émile Baudot (1845-1903).

NounEdit

baud m (plural bauds)

  1. baud

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

baud

  1. Romanization of 𐌱𐌰𐌿𐌳

Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

baud

  1. past of by

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Frankish *bald or similar Germanic source, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *balþaz.

AdjectiveEdit

baud m (oblique and nominative feminine singular baude)

  1. bold; brave
  2. cheerful; full of ardour

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

baud m (plural bauds)

  1. (computing, telecommunications) baud (a rate defined as the number of signalling events per second)

ScotsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

baud (comparative mair baud, superlative maist baud)

  1. bad