See also: Baud

English edit

 
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Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French baud. Named for French inventor Jean-Maurice-Émile Baudot (1845-1903).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /bɔːd/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔːd

Noun edit

baud (countable and uncountable, plural bauds)

  1. (computing, telecommunications) A unit of data transmission symbol rate; the number of signalling events per second.
    • 1985 April 13, Stephanie Poggi, “Queer Hackers”, in Gay Community News, page 2:
      To reach the Backroom Bulletin Board, call (718) 849-6699 with a computer, using either the 300 or 1200 baud setting on the modem.
  2. (computing, informal) bps (bits per second), regardless of how many bits are represented by each symbol.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Anagrams edit

Czech edit

Noun edit

baud m inan

  1. baud (unit of rate of data transmission)

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • baud in Kartotéka Novočeského lexikálního archivu
  • baud in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dalmatian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin vōx, vocem, possibly influenced by vōtum.

Noun edit

baud f

  1. voice

Dibabawon Manobo edit

Noun edit

baud

  1. pigeon

French edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old French baud, bald (joyous, full of ardor), from Frankish *bald, *balt, from Proto-Germanic *balþaz (strong, bold) (compare English bold, Dutch boud).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

baud m (plural bauds)

  1. a type of hunting dog
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from English baud. Named for French inventor Jean-Maurice-Émile Baudot (1845-1903).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

baud m (plural bauds)

  1. baud (unit)

Further reading edit

Gothic edit

Romanization edit

baud

  1. Romanization of 𐌱𐌰𐌿𐌳

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Verb edit

baud

  1. (non-standard since 2005) past tense of by
  2. (non-standard since 2005) past tense of byde

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Verb edit

baud

  1. past tense of by

Old French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Frankish *bald or similar Germanic source, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *balþaz.

Pronunciation edit

  • (archaic) IPA(key): /ˈbalt/
  • (classical) IPA(key): /ˈbau̯t/

Adjective edit

baud m (oblique and nominative feminine singular baude)

  1. bold; brave
  2. cheerful; full of ardour

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Bourguignon: baud
  • Middle French: baud
  • Italian: baldo
  • Middle English: bawde, baude (noun)

Portuguese edit

Pronunciation edit

 
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈbaw.d͡ʒi/ [ˈbaʊ̯.d͡ʒi], /ˈbawd͡ʒ/ [ˈbaʊ̯d͡ʒ]
    • (Southern Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈbawd͡ʒ/ [ˈbaʊ̯d͡ʒ], /ˈbaw.d͡ʒi/ [ˈbaʊ̯.d͡ʒi]

  • Hyphenation: baud

Noun edit

baud m (plural bauds)

  1. (computing, telecommunications) baud (a rate defined as the number of signalling events per second)

Romansch edit

Alternative forms edit

  • baul (Sursilvan)
  • bòld (Sutsilvan)
  • bod (Surmiran, Puter, Vallader)

Etymology edit

From German bald.

Adverb edit

baud

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun) early

Scots edit

Adjective edit

baud (comparative mair baud, superlative maist baud)

  1. bad