See also: Bing, bìng, bīng, bǐng, biŋ, and B.Ing.

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bɪŋ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /bɪŋ/, [biŋ]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋ

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English bing, binge, benge, from Old Norse bingr (heap of corn; bed; bolster), cognate with Scots bing, Swedish binge (heap), Danish bing (bin; box; compartment).

Cf also Scottish Gaelic binnean meaning a small hill or slag heap.

NounEdit

bing (plural bings)

  1. (slang) Prison solitary confinement, a term used by inmates.
  2. (mostly Scotland) A slag heap, i.e. a man-made mound or heap formed with the waste material (slag) as a by-product of coal mining or the shale oil industry. Can also refer to the waste by-product from a foundry or furnace, formed into such a mound.
  3. (Britain) (mostly Scotland) A heap or pile.

Etymology 2Edit

Origin obscure. Compare Scots bin (to move speedily with noise).

VerbEdit

bing (third-person singular simple present bings, present participle binging, simple past and past participle binged)

  1. (dated slang or dialectal) To go; walk; come; run

Etymology 3Edit

Onomatopoeia of a bouncing sound.

Alternative formsEdit

InterjectionEdit

bing

  1. (onomatopoeia) The sound made by a bounce, or by striking a metallic surface

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

bing (plural bings)

  1. The sound made by a bell, an onomatopœia
    • Toronto Star, "Ryanair looking at standing 'seats,' pay toilets", 2 July 2010, Jim Rankin [1]
      Bing! Ladies and gentlemen, in a few minutes the captain will turn off the fasten seatbelt sign, but for your own safety we recommend you stay seated and with your seatbelt securely fastened at all times.
    • Douglas Florian, 1994 [2]
      Bing Bang Boing
    • David Chase, 2003 [3]
      The Tao of Bada Bing
  2. A sound made by a bounce
  3. A bounce

VerbEdit

bing (third-person singular simple present bings, present participle binging, simple past and past participle binged)

  1. Making the sound of a bounce
  2. To bounce

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


Khumi ChinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate to Burmese ဘိန်း (bhin:).

NounEdit

bing

  1. opium

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

bing

  1. Nonstandard spelling of bīng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of bǐng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of bìng.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

ManxEdit

Etymology 1Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

bing f (genitive singular bingagh or bingey, plural bingaghyn)

  1. committee
  2. (law) jury
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish bind, binn (melodious, harmonious; sweet, pleasing).

AdjectiveEdit

bing

  1. tuneful, musical, sweet
  2. shrill
Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bing ving ming
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

bing m (definite singular bingen, indefinite plural binger, definite plural bingene)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2005; superseded by binge

Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

bing m (definite singular bingen, indefinite plural bingar, definite plural bingane)

  1. alternative form of binge

ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse bingr; cf. Middle English bynge (a bin, enclosure, pen).

Cf also Scottish Gaelic binnean meaning a small hill or slag heap.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bing (plural bings)

  1. A man-made mound or heap formed with the waste material (slag) as a by-product of coal mining or the shale oil industry. Can also refer to the waste by-product from a foundry or furnace, formed into such a mound.
  2. A heap or pile.
  3. A small hill, usually manmade.

VerbEdit

bing (third-person singular present bings, present participle bingin, past bingt, past participle bingt)

  1. To pile up; to create a bing.

YagaraEdit

NounEdit

bing

  1. father

ReferencesEdit


ZhuangEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Tai *pliːŋᴬ (aquatic leech). Cognate with Thai ปลิง (bpling), Lao ປີງ (pīng), ᦔᦲᧂ (ṗiing), Shan ပိင် (pǐng).

NounEdit

bing (old orthography biŋ)

  1. aquatic leech

Etymology 2Edit

From Mandarin (bīng).

NounEdit

bing (old orthography biŋ)

  1. soldier; army