Translingual

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Symbol

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bin

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Edo.

English

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A rubbish bin.

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English binne, from Old English binne (crib, manger), from Proto-West Germanic *binnu, *binnā, from Gaulish benna (four-wheeled cart; caisson) (compare Old Irish buinne, Welsh benn (cart), Old Breton benn (caisson)). Cognate with West Frisian bin (wicker basket), Middle Dutch benne (basket), whence modern Dutch ben (wicker basket), German Benne (wheelbarrow).

Noun

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bin (plural bins)

  1. A box, frame, crib, or enclosed place, used as a storage container.
    Synonyms: container, receptacle
    a corn bin
    a wine bin
    a coal bin
  2. A container for rubbish or waste.
    Synonyms: (British) dustbin, (British, Australian) rubbish bin, (US) garbage can, trash can; see also Thesaurus:waste bin
    a rubbish bin
    a wastepaper bin
    an ashes bin
    • 2013 August 10, Lexington, “Keeping the mighty honest”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8848:
      British journalists shun complete respectability, feeling a duty to be ready to savage the mighty, or rummage through their bins. Elsewhere in Europe, government contracts and subsidies ensure that press barons will only defy the mighty so far.
  3. (statistics) Any of the discrete intervals in a histogram, etc
  4. Any of the fixed-size chunks into which airspace is divided for the purposes of radar.
  5. (MLE, slang, uncommon) Jail or prison.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:jail
    • 2018 October 22, “Subs”, Slipz of Hoxton (lyrics)‎[1]:
      Free up my G's locked in the bin
      Jail house comin' like subs
      one comes out then one goes in
  6. (slang) Short for loony bin (lunatic asylum).
    • 1973, New Scientist, volume 58, number 852, page 822:
      At the moment, and in "an emergency", you or I could be sent to the bin, willy-nilly, on the say-so of a single doctor (who may never have seen us before, and need have no particular experience of mental illness), so long as the application is supported by one of our relatives, or by a "social worker".
  7. (video post-production) A digital file folder for organising media in a non-linear editing program.
Derived terms
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Translations
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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb

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bin (third-person singular simple present bins, present participle binning, simple past and past participle binned)

  1. (chiefly British, informal) To dispose of (something) by putting it into a bin, or as if putting it into a bin.
    Synonyms: chuck, chuck away, discard, dump; see also Thesaurus:junk
    • 2008, Tom Holt, Falling Sideways, Orbit books,, →ISBN, page 28:
      He put the bank statement in the shoebox marked "Bank Statements" and binned the rest.
  2. (British, informal) To throw away, reject, give up.
    • 2002, Christopher Harvie, Scotland: A Short History, Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 59:
      This splendid eloquence was promptly binned by the pope, []
    • 2005, Ian Oliver, War and peace in the Balkans: the diplomacy of conflict in the former Yugoslavia, I.B. Tauris, →ISBN, page 238:
      The CC [Co-ordinating Centre] had long since binned the idea of catching the regular shuttle service, []
    • 2021 September 22, Howard Johnston, “NR: stop firefighting and plan for long-term progress”, in RAIL, number 940, page 11:
      NR also wants more effort made to bin out-of-date 1970s technology, but only replacing it with equipment that meets customer needs, rather than high-tech kit just for the sake of it.
  3. (statistics) To convert continuous data into discrete groups.
  4. (transitive) To place into a bin for storage.
    to bin wine
Translations
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Etymology 2

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From Arabic بِن (bin, son).

Noun

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bin

  1. (in Arabic names) son of; equivalent to Hebrew בן (ben).

Etymology 3

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Contraction of being

Contraction

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bin

  1. (text messaging) Contraction of being.

Etymology 4

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Contraction of been

Verb

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bin

  1. (obsolete, dialectal and text messaging) Alternative form of been
    • 1669, Christopher Merrett, letter to Thomas Browne:
      Many of the lupus piscis I have seen, and have bin informed by the king's fishmonger they are taken on our coast []

Etymology 5

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Clipping of binary.

Noun

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bin (countable and uncountable, plural bins)

  1. (computing) Clipping of binary.

Anagrams

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Biak

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Noun

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bin

  1. woman
    • [2]: FAFYAR BEKUR KORBEN MA BIN YOMGA : "THE STORY ABOUT DRAGON AND THE YOMGA WOMAN"
      Korben ine fyair bin berande ido bebaraprapen ro yaf narewara bo bebur mumra si. : This dragon usually watched the women who usually went landward and roasted (food) along the gardens and went home seaward.

Dalmatian

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Etymology

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From Latin bene. Compare Romanian bine, Italian bene, Spanish bien, French bien.

Adverb

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bin

  1. well
    Ju sai bin.I am well.

Noun

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bin

  1. good

Egyptian

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Romanization

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bin

  1. Manuel de Codage transliteration of bjn.

French

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Pronunciation

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Adverb

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bin

  1. Alternative spelling of bien

German

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Etymology

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From Middle High German, from Old High German bim (am), from Proto-Germanic *biumi (first-person singular present active indicative of Proto-Germanic *beuną (to be)), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰew- (to be, become, appear). Cognate with Dutch ben (am), Old English bēom (am). More at be.

German bin and Dutch ben have two sources:

Pronunciation

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Verb

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bin

  1. first-person singular present of sein

References

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  1. ^ Friedrich Kluge (1989) “bin”, in Elmar Seebold, editor, Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache [Etymological Dictionary of the German Language] (in German), 22nd edition, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, →ISBN

Guinea-Bissau Creole

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Etymology

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From Portuguese vir. Cognate with Kabuverdianu ben.

Verb

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bin

  1. to come

Indonesian

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Etymology

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From Malay bin, from Classical Malay bin, from Arabic بِن (bin, son).

Noun

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bin (first-person possessive binku, second-person possessive binmu, third-person possessive binnya)

  1. son (of)

Japanese

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Romanization

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bin

  1. Rōmaji transcription of びん

Krio

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Etymology

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From English been.

Pronunciation

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IPA(key): /bìn/

Particle

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bìn

  1. Marks simple past tense

Maltese

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Etymology

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From Arabic بِن (bin). One of very few words in which a stressed final short vowel is not indicated by doubling the following consonant (another example being lil). This is because there is no gemination before suffixes (compare e.g. binha (her son)).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bin

  1. construct form of iben
    Bin il-BniedemSon of Man

Usage notes

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  • As a tendency, this form is used before the definite article and before names, while unchanged iben is used otherwise.

Mandarin

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Romanization

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bin

  1. Nonstandard spelling of bīn.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of bǐn.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of bìn.

Usage notes

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  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

North Frisian

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Etymology

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From Old Frisian binda, which derives from Proto-Germanic *bindaną.

Verb

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bin

  1. (Heligoland) to bind

Northern Kurdish

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Etymology

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From Proto-Iranian *buHnáh (base, foundation), from Proto-Indo-Iranian *bʰudʰnás (bottom, ground), from a reshaping of Proto-Indo-European *bʰudʰ(m̥)nés, genitive singular of *bʰudʰmḗn (bottom). Related to Ossetian бын (byn), Persian بن (bon).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bin m (Arabic spelling بن)

  1. foundation, bottom; base
    Synonym: verenk
    Antonyms: qehf, ser

Declension

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Preposition

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bin (Arabic spelling بن)

  1. below, under, beneath
    Antonym: ser

References

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  • Chyet, Michael L. (2020) “bin I”, in Ferhenga Birûskî: Kurmanji–English Dictionary (Language Series; 1), volume 1, London: Transnational Press, page 81
  • Chyet, Michael L. (2020) “bin II”, in Ferhenga Birûskî: Kurmanji–English Dictionary (Language Series; 1), volume 1, London: Transnational Press, page 81

Papiamentu

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Spanish venir and Kabuverdianu ben.

Verb

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bin

  1. to come

Swahili

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Arabic بِن (bin, son).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bin (n class, plural bin)

  1. son of
    Khamis bin AbdallahKhamis the son of Abdallah

Swedish

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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bin

  1. indefinite plural of bi

Taivoan

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Noun

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bin

  1. brother

Talysh

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Verb

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bin

  1. present stem of vinde

Tok Pisin

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Etymology 1

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From English been.

Particle

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bin

  1. Marks the simple past tense.
See also
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Tok Pisin tense and aspect markers:

Etymology 2

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From English bean.

Noun

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bin

  1. bean, beans

Turkish

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Turkish numbers (edit)
 ←  100  ←  900 1,000
100
    Cardinal: bin
    Ordinal: bininci
    Distributive: biner

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Ottoman Turkish بیك (biŋ, thousand), from Proto-Turkic *bïŋ (thousand). Cognate with Old Turkic 𐰉𐰃𐰭 (b¹iŋ /⁠bïŋ⁠/), 𐰋𐰃𐰭 (b²iŋ /⁠biŋ⁠/), Old Uyghur mynk (mïŋ, thousand), Bashkir мең (meñ, thousand), Tatar мең (meñ, thousand) and Mongolian мянган (mjangan, thousand) a Turkic borrowing.

Noun

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bin

  1. thousand
Declension
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Inflection
Nominative bin
Definite accusative bini
Singular Plural
Nominative bin binler
Definite accusative bini binleri
Dative bine binlere
Locative binde binlerde
Ablative binden binlerden
Genitive binin binlerin
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular binim binlerim
2nd singular binin binlerin
3rd singular bini binleri
1st plural binimiz binlerimiz
2nd plural bininiz binleriniz
3rd plural binleri binleri
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular binimi binlerimi
2nd singular binini binlerini
3rd singular binini binlerini
1st plural binimizi binlerimizi
2nd plural bininizi binlerinizi
3rd plural binlerini binlerini
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular binime binlerime
2nd singular binine binlerine
3rd singular binine binlerine
1st plural binimize binlerimize
2nd plural bininize binlerinize
3rd plural binlerine binlerine
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular binimde binlerimde
2nd singular bininde binlerinde
3rd singular bininde binlerinde
1st plural binimizde binlerimizde
2nd plural bininizde binlerinizde
3rd plural binlerinde binlerinde
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular binimden binlerimden
2nd singular bininden binlerinden
3rd singular bininden binlerinden
1st plural binimizden binlerimizden
2nd plural bininizden binlerinizden
3rd plural binlerinden binlerinden
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular binimin binlerimin
2nd singular bininin binlerinin
3rd singular bininin binlerinin
1st plural binimizin binlerimizin
2nd plural bininizin binlerinizin
3rd plural binlerinin binlerinin
Derived terms
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  • binbir (very many, literally a thousand and one)
  • binlerce (thousands of)

Etymology 2

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Verb

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bin

  1. second-person singular imperative of binmek

Welsh

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Etymology 1

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Borrowed from English bin.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bin m (plural biniau or bins)

  1. bin, trashcan

Mutation

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Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bin fin min unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Etymology 2

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Mutated form of pin (pine trees).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bin

  1. Soft mutation of pin (pine trees).

Mutation

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Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
pin bin mhin phin
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Yola

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Etymology

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Originated 1250–1300 from Middle English beynge.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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bin

  1. being
    • 1927, “PAUDEEN FOUGHLAAN'S WEDDEEN”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, page 133, line 3:
      Shu bin vrem Vorth, an hay vrem Bargee,
      She being from Forth and he from Bargy;

References

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  • Kathleen A. Browne (1927) The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland Sixth Series, Vol.17 No.2, Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, page 133

Zoogocho Zapotec

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Spanish vena, from Latin vēna.

Noun

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bin

  1. vein

References

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  • Long C., Rebecca, Cruz M., Sofronio (2000) Diccionario zapoteco de San Bartolomé Zoogocho, Oaxaca (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 38)‎[3] (in Spanish), second electronic edition, Coyoacán, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 16