EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bleten, from Old English blǣtan (to bleat), from Proto-Germanic *blētijaną (to bleat). Cognate with Scots blete, bleit, Saterland Frisian blēte, blētsje, Dutch blaten, bleiten, Low German bleten, German blaßen, blässen.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbliːt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːt

NounEdit

bleat (plural bleats)

  1. The characteristic cry of a sheep or a goat.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

bleat (third-person singular simple present bleats, present participle bleating, simple past and past participle bleated)

  1. Of a sheep or goat, to make its characteristic cry; of a human, to mimic this sound.
    • 1936, Rollo Ahmed, The Black Art, London: Long, page 99:
      In the year 1633, the Bridget Nuns, near Xanthus, behaved like sheep, jumping about and bleating continuously.
  2. (informal, derogatory) Of a person, to complain.
    The last thing we need is to hear them bleating to us about organizational problems.

SynonymsEdit

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Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *blautaz, whence also Old High German blōz (naked), Old Norse blautr. More at blouse.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

blēat

  1. wretched

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: *blete, *bleet

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian blāt, from Proto-Germanic *blautaz.

AdjectiveEdit

bleat

  1. bare, naked
  2. poor

InflectionEdit

Inflection of bleat
uninflected bleat
inflected bleate
comparative bleater
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial bleat bleater it bleatst
it bleatste
indefinite c. sing. bleate bleatere bleatste
n. sing. bleat bleater bleatste
plural bleate bleatere bleatste
definite bleate bleatere bleatste
partitive bleats bleaters

Further readingEdit

  • bleat (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011