See also: Mee, meé, me'e, mee-, me'ẽ, and mēē

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English mee, variant of me, from Old English (me). More at me.

PronounEdit

mee (personal pronoun)

  1. Obsolete form of me.
  2. obsolete emphatic of me

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowing Min Nan ().

NounEdit

mee (countable and uncountable, plural mees)

  1. (cooking, Malaysia, Singapore) Noodles, or a dish containing noodles.
    • 1956, Anthony Burgess, Time for a Tiger (The Malayan Trilogy), published 1972, page 116:
      He watched with pleasure the food sellers swirling the frying mee round in their kualis over primitive charcoal fires.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch mee, from older mede with the frequent loss of intervocalic -d-.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

mee

  1. (postpositional) adverbial form of met

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From older mede with the frequent loss of intervocalic -d- (cf. kou vs. koude ["cold"]; slee vs. slede ["sleigh"]). The forms mee and mede were subsequently distributed to different senses.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /meː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: mee
  • Rhymes: -eː

AdverbEdit

mee

  1. (postpositional) adverbial form of met
  2. along, together (i.e. with one)

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: mee
  • Jersey Dutch:

AdjectiveEdit

mee (used only predicatively, not comparable)

  1. able to follow
    Ik ben niet meer mee.
    I cannot follow anymore.

EstonianEdit

NounEdit

mee

  1. genitive singular of mesi

IndonesianEdit

NounEdit

mee (first-person possessive meeku, second-person possessive meemu, third-person possessive meenya)

  1. Misspelling of mi.

LuxembourgishEdit

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

mee

  1. Alternative form of

MalayEdit

NounEdit

mee

  1. Misspelling of mi.

ManxEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish , from Proto-Celtic *mī, from Proto-Indo-European *me (me).

PronounEdit

mee (emphatic mish)

  1. I, me
    Ta mee aynshoh.I am here.
    As ta mee gra riu.And I say unto you.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish , from Proto-Celtic *mīns, from Proto-Indo-European *mḗh₁n̥s (moon, month).

NounEdit

mee f (genitive singular mee, plural meeghyn)

  1. month
    Mee HouneyNovember
    Mee LuanistynAugust
    mee ny heaystlunar month
    mee ny molleyhoneymoon

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
mee vee unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *mē, from Proto-Germanic *maiz.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

mêe

  1. more

Alternative formsEdit

AdverbEdit

mêe

  1. more, to a greater degree
    Antonym: min
  2. more often, more frequently
    Antonym: min
  3. better
  4. rather
  5. later, further on in time
  6. also, furthermore

Alternative formsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • mee (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • mee (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000

NaxiEdit

 
"mee" written in Dongba script

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan [Term?].

NounEdit

mee

  1. sky
  2. heaven

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

mee

  1. mark; print

ClassifierEdit

mee

  1. classifier for a mark or print

Etymology 3Edit

Naxi cardinal numbers
 <  9999 10000 10001  > 
    Cardinal : mee

NumeralEdit

mee

  1. ten thousand

NeapolitanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mèe f pl (first person singular possessive)

  1. Alternative form of mèje; feminine plural of mìo

PronounEdit

mèe f pl (first person singular possessive)

  1. Alternative form of mèje; feminine plural of mìo

SinacantánEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mee

  1. green or blue

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Vocabularios de la lengua xinca de Sinacantan (1868, D. Juan Gavarrete)

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

mee

  1. inflection of mear:
    1. first-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular present subjunctive
    3. third-person singular imperative

YolaEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English me, from Old English , from Proto-West Germanic, from Proto-Germanic *miz, dative of *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *me.

Alternative formsEdit

PronounEdit

mee

  1. oblique of ich: me
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY:
      Dinna ishe mee a raison.
      Do not ask me the reason.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English mi, my, apocopated form of min, myn, from Old English mīn (my, mine), from Proto-West Germanic *mīn.

DeterminerEdit

mee

  1. my
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY:
      Ich at mee dhree meales.
      I ate my three meals.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 23 & 48