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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English braggen (to make a loud noise; to speak boastfully) of unknown origin. Possibly related to the Middle English adjective brag (prideful; spirited), which is probably of Celtic origin;[1] or from Old Norse bragr (best; foremost; poetry);[2] or through Old English from Old Norse braka (to creak).[3]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brag (plural brags)

  1. A boast or boasting; bragging; ostentatious pretence or self-glorification.
    • (Can we date this quote?) William Shakespeare
      Caesar [] made not here his brag / Of "came", and "saw", and "overcame".
  2. The thing which is boasted of.
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Milton
      Beauty is Nature's brag.
    • 2015 October 27, Matt Preston, The Simple Secrets to Cooking Everything Better[1], Plum, →ISBN, page 192:
      You could just use ordinary shop-bought kecap manis to marinade the meat, but making your own is easy, has a far more elegant fragrance and is, above all, such a great brag! Flavouring kecap manis is an intensely personal thing, so try this version now and next time cook the sauce down with crushed, split lemongrass and a shredded lime leaf.
  3. (by ellipsis) The card game three card brag.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chesterfield to this entry?)

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

brag (third-person singular simple present brags, present participle bragging, simple past and past participle bragged)

  1. (intransitive) To boast; to talk with excessive pride about what one has, is able to do, or has done; often as an attempt to popularize oneself.
    to brag of one's exploits, courage, or money
    • (Can we date this quote?) William Shakespeare
      Conceit, more rich in matter than in words, / Brags of his substance, not of ornament.
      Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade
  2. (transitive) To boast of.

SynonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

brag (comparative bragger, superlative braggest)

  1. Excellent; first-rate.
  2. (archaic) Brisk; full of spirits; boasting; pretentious; conceited.
    a brag young fellow

AdverbEdit

brag (comparative more brag, superlative most brag)

  1. (obsolete) proudly; boastfully
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fuller to this entry?)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ brag” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.
  2. ^ wile” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.;
  3. ^ brag in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse brak.

NounEdit

brag n (singular definite braget, plural indefinite brag)

  1. bang, crash

InflectionEdit

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

brag

  1. imperative of brage

North FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian bregge, which derives from Proto-Germanic *brugjǭ. Cognates include West Frisian brêge.

NounEdit

brag f (plural bragen)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) bridge