See also: bríg

EnglishEdit

 
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a Brig-rigged vessel

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Abbreviated from brigantine, from Italian brigantino; in sense “jail”, from the use of such ships as prisons.

NounEdit

brig (plural brigs)

  1. (nautical) A two-masted vessel, square-rigged on both foremast and mainmast
  2. (US) A jail or guardhouse, especially in a naval military prison or jail on a ship, navy base, or (in fiction) spacecraft.
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Scots brig, from Old Norse bryggja, from Proto-Germanic *brugjǭ. Doublet of bridge.

NounEdit

brig (plural brigs)

  1. (Scotland, Northern Ireland, Northern England) Bridge.

Etymology 3Edit

Clipping of brigadier

NounEdit

brig (plural brigs)

  1. Brigadier.

ReferencesEdit

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Inherited from Old English bryċġ.

NounEdit

brig

  1. Alternative form of brigge

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Old Norse bryggja. Doublet of brigge.

NounEdit

brig

  1. bridge
Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Scots: brig, brigg, breeg
    • English: brig, brigg

Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brig

  1. inflection of brí:
    1. accusative/dative singular
    2. nominative/vocative/accusative dual/plural

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
brig brig
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
mbrig
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

PolabianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *bergъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brig m

  1. bank, shore (of a river)

ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English brig, from Old Norse bryggja.

NounEdit

brig

  1. bridge
    Stirling BrigStirling Bridge
    The craic brigThe craic bridge (craic is an Irish spelling of the word crack, but both spellings have the same meaning)
    • 1839, The Life of Mansie Wauch[1]:
      “Dinna flatter me,” said James; [] replacing his glasses on the brig of his nose, he then read us a screed of metre [].
      “Don’t flatter me,” said James; [] replacing his glasses on the bridge of his nose, he then read us a screed of metre.

DescendantsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English brig.

NounEdit

brig m (Cyrillic spelling бриг)

  1. A brig (two-masted vessel)

SynonymsEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brig m (plural brigau)

  1. crest, peak, summit, top

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
brig frig mrig unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.