See also: bríg and Brig

English

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a Brig-rigged vessel

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /bɹɪɡ/
  • Audio (US):(file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪɡ

Etymology 1

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Abbreviated from brigantine, from Italian brigantino; in sense “jail”, from the use of such ships as prisons.

Noun

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brig (plural brigs)

  1. (nautical) A two-masted vessel, square-rigged on both foremast and mainmast
  2. (US) A jail or guardhouse, especially in a naval military prison or jail on a ship, navy base, or (in fiction) spacecraft.
Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • French: brick
    • Romanian: bric
    • Ottoman Turkish: بریق (brik)
  • Irish: bruig
  • Portuguese: brigue
Translations
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See also
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Verb

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brig (third-person singular simple present brigs, present participle brigging, simple past and past participle brigged)

  1. (US, military slang, dated) To merely pretend to be occupied, to lollygag.
  2. (US, military slang, dated) To jail, to confine into the guardhouse.
See also
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References
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  • Lighter, Jonathan (1972) “The Slang of the American Expeditionary Forces in Europe, 1917-1919: An Historical Glossary”, in American Speech[1], volume 47, number 1/2, page 22

Etymology 2

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From Scots brig, from Old Norse bryggja, from Proto-Germanic *brugjǭ. Doublet of bridge.

Noun

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brig (plural brigs)

  1. (Scotland, Northern Ireland, Northern England) Bridge.
Derived terms
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Etymology 3

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Clipping of brigadier

Noun

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brig (plural brigs)

  1. Brigadier.

References

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  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

Anagrams

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Middle English

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Old English bryċġ.

Noun

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brig

  1. Alternative form of brigge

Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Old Norse bryggja. Doublet of brigge.

Noun

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brig

  1. bridge
Alternative forms
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Descendants
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Old Irish

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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brig

  1. inflection of brí:
    1. accusative/dative singular
    2. nominative/vocative/accusative dual/plural

Mutation

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Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
brig brig
pronounced with /β(ʲ)-/
mbrig
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Polabian

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Etymology

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From Proto-Slavic *bergъ, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *bérgas, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰérǵʰos, from *bʰerǵʰ-.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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brig m ?

  1. bank, shore (of a river)

References

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  • The template Template:R:pox:SejDp does not use the parameter(s):
    3=1
    Please see Module:checkparams for help with this warning.
    Lehr-Spławiński, T., Polański, K. (1962) “brig”, in Słownik etymologiczny języka Drzewian połabskich [Etymological Dictionary of the Polabian Drevani Language] (in Polish), number 1 (A – ďüzd), Wrocław, Warszawa etc.: Ossolineum, page 52
  • Polański, Kazimierz, James Allen Sehnert (1967) “brig”, in Polabian-English Dictionary, The Hague, Paris: Mouton & Co, page 41

Scots

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Middle English brig, from Old Norse bryggja.

Noun

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brig

  1. bridge
    Stirling BrigStirling Bridge
    • 1839, The Life of Mansie Wauch[2]:
      “Dinna flatter me,” said James; [] replacing his glasses on the brig of his nose, he then read us a screed of metre [].
      “Don’t flatter me,” said James; [] replacing his glasses on the bridge of his nose, he then read us a screed of metre.

Descendants

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Serbo-Croatian

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Inherited from Proto-Slavic *bergъ, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *bérgas, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰérǵʰos, from *bʰerǵʰ-.

Noun

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brȋg m (Cyrillic spelling бри̑г)

  1. hill, hillock (smaller hill)

Declension

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Welsh

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Etymology

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Morris Jones derives it from Proto-Celtic *krīkʷā (trench; boundary) [see crib (comb; ridge)], by metathesis.[1]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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brig pl (no singulative)

  1. treetop, crown of a tree
  2. crest, peak, summit, top
  3. hair (on head)
    Synonym: gwallt

Derived terms

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Mutation

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Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
brig frig mrig unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

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  1. ^ Morris Jones, John (1913) A Welsh Grammar, Historical and Comparative, Oxford: Clarendon Press, § 97 v 3