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See also: captivé

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English captif; in turn ultimately from Latin captīvus, probably through a borrowing from a Middle French intermediate. Doublet of caitiff.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

captive (plural captives)

  1. One who has been captured or is otherwise confined.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 19, in The China Governess[1]:
      When Timothy and Julia hurried up the staircase to the bedroom floor, where a considerable commotion was taking place, Tim took Barry Leach with him. He had him gripped firmly by the arm, since he felt it was not safe to let him loose, and he had no immediate idea what to do with him. The captive made no resistance […].
  2. One held prisoner.
  3. (figuratively) One charmed or subdued by beauty, excellence, or affection; one who is captivated.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

captive (not comparable)

  1. Held prisoner; not free; confined.
  2. Subdued by love; charmed; captivated.
    • (Can we date this quote?) William Shakespeare
      Even in so short a space, my woman's heart / Grossly grew captive to his honey words.
  3. Of or relating to bondage or confinement; serving to confine.
    captive chains; captive hours

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

captive (third-person singular simple present captives, present participle captiving, simple past and past participle captived)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To capture; to take captive.

FrenchEdit

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

captīve

  1. vocative masculine singular of captīvus

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

captive

  1. Alternative form of captif