See also: Mille

Corsican edit

Etymology edit

From Latin mille, from Proto-Italic *smīɣeslī, from Proto-Indo-European *smih₂ǵʰéslih₂. Cognates include Italian mille and French mille.

Numeral edit

mille

  1. a thousand

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French mille (thousand), from Latin mīlle.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /mil/, /ˈmi.lə/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: mil‧le

Noun edit

mille n (uncountable)

  1. grand (sum of the value of 1,000 monetary units)

Estonian edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

mille

  1. genitive singular of mis

Finnish edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

mille

  1. allative singular/plural of mikä

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle French mille, from Old French mile, from Latin mīlle (thousand) (plural mīlia), from Proto-Italic *smīɣeslī, from Proto-Indo-European *smih₂ǵʰéslih₂ (one thousand).

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

French numbers (edit)
10,000[a], [b]
 ←  100 [a], [b] ←  900 1,000 2,000  → [a], [b] 10,000  → [a], [b]
100
    Cardinal: mille
    Ordinal: millième
    Ordinal abbreviation: 1000e, (now nonstandard) 1000ème

mille (invariable)

  1. thousand, one thousand, a thousand
    Presque mille enfants y habitent.Almost a thousand children live there.

Noun edit

mille m (plural milles)

  1. mile (abbreviation mi)
  2. Short for mille nautique (nautical mile).
  3. bullseye

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Dutch: mille
  • Garifuna: milu (possibly)
  • German: Mille
  • Louisiana Creole: mil
  • Vurës: mil

See also edit

Further reading edit

Italian edit

Italian numbers (edit)
10,000
 ←  100  ←  900 1,000 1,001  →  2,000  → 
100
    Cardinal: mille
    Ordinal: millesimo
    Ordinal abbreviation: 1000º

Etymology edit

From Latin mīlle, from Proto-Italic *smīɣeslī, from Proto-Indo-European *smih₂ǵʰéslih₂ (one thousand). Doublet of miglio.

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

mille (invariable)

  1. thousand, one thousand

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

See also edit

Latin edit

Latin numbers (edit)
 ←  900 M
1,000
1,000,000 (106)  → 
100
    Cardinal: mīlle
    Ordinal: mīllēsimus
    Adverbial: mīlliēns, mīlliēs
    Distributive: mīllēnī
 
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Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Italic *smīɣeslī, from Proto-Indo-European *smih₂ǵʰéslih₂ (one thousand), from *sm̥- (one) (whence also semel) and *ǵʰes- (hand) (whence also hir, Ancient Greek χείρ (kheír), Sanskrit हस्त (hasta)), as if “full hand”.[1] Cognates include Ancient Greek χίλιοι (khílioi), Persianهزار(hezâr), and Sanskrit सहस्र (sahásra).

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

mīlle (genitive mīlle); semi-indeclinable numeral

  1. thousand; 1000
    Mīlle hominum rīsit, or, mīlle hominēs rīsērunt or, less preferrably, mīlle hominum rīsērunt.A thousand people laughed.
    Duo mīlia ovium tōnsa sunt.Two thousand sheep have been sheared.
    • c. 177 CE, Aulus Gellius, Noctes Atticae 1.16.13:
      Lūcīlius autem . . .

      mīllī nummum potes ūnō quaerere centum

      'mīllī passum' dīxit prō 'mīlle passibus' et 'ūnō mīllī nummum' prō 'ūnīs mīlle nummīs', apertēque ostendit 'mīlle' et vocābulum esse et singulārī numerō dīci eiusque plūrātivum esse 'mīlia' et cāsum etiam capere ablātīvum
      While Lucilius wrote . . .

      With a thousand sesterces you can get a hundred thousand.

      milli passum instead of mille passibus and uno milli nummum for unis mille nummis, thus showing clearly that mille is a noun, used in the singular number, that its plural is milia, and that it even forms an ablative case.
    • 70 BCE, Cicero, In Verrem 2.148:
      nōn mīlle, nōn duo, nec tria mīlia, sed ad ūnās ūnius agrī decumās trīticī modium trīgintā voluisse addere
      was prepared to pay not a thousand, not two, not three thousand, but thirty thousand pecks of wheat above the going price for the individual tithes of one single district
    • 59 BC–AD 17, Titus Livius, Ab Urbe Condita 42.55:
      Chalcide cum Attalō et quattuor mīlibus peditum, mīlle equitum ad cōnsulem vēnit.
      A thousand horsemen came to the consul from Chalkis, accompanied by Attalus and by four thousand foot soldiers.
    • c. 117 CE, Tacitus, Annales 13.40:
      et tergum mīlle equitēs tuēbantur
      and a thousand horsemen were guarding the rear
    • 405 CE, Jerome, Vulgate Iob.42.12:
      Dominus autem benedīxit novissimīs Iob magis quam prīncipiō eius, et facta sunt ei quattuordecim mīlia ovium, et sex mīlia camēlōrum, et mīlle iuga boum, et mīlle asinae
      Moreover, God blessed Job's last days more than at the beginning, as 14000 sheep were made, and 6000 camels, and a thousand yoke of oxen, and a thousand female donkeys.
Usage notes edit
  • The singular form can be:
    • originally a neuter noun with singular agreement taking the noun in genitive plural: mīlle mīlitum vēnit;
    • an indeclinable adjective with plural agreement, by analogy with other cardinal numerals: mīlle mīlitēs vēnērunt ("a thousand soldiers came");
    • or even a neuter noun with plural agreement, perhaps in a partitive sense: as in mīlle mīlitum vēnērunt.
  • The plural form normally behaves as a fully-declinable neuter noun of the third declension, with which the predicate agrees, as in duo mīlia mīlitum capta ("two thousand soldiers were captured");
    • but not if part of a compound numeral, and not with personal reference in the absence of a genitive, in which case it's an adjective, as in duo mīlia quīngentae (mīlitēs) captae ("two thousand five hundred women (soldiers) were captured"), tria mīlia captī ("three thousand were captured").
  • An ablative singular form mīllī also occurs - see usage examples.
  • For additional information see Appendix:Latin cardinal numerals.
Declension edit

Semi-indeclinable numeral.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem./Neut. Masc./Fem./Neut.
Nominative mīlle mīlia
mīllia
Genitive mīlium
mīllium
Dative mīlibus
mīllibus
Accusative mīlia
mīllia
Ablative mīlibus
mīllibus
Vocative mīlia
mīllia
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Balkan Romance:
  • Dalmatian:
  • Italo-Romance:
  • North Italian:
  • Gallo-Romance:
  • Occitano-Romance:
  • Ibero-Romance:
    • Aragonese: mil
    • Asturian: mil
    • Galician: mil
    • Mirandese: mil
    • Portuguese: mil
    • Old Spanish: mil, mill
      • Spanish: mil (see there for further descendants)
  • Insular Romance:
  • Ancient borrowings:
    • Basque: mila
    • Old Irish: míle
    • Proto-Brythonic: *mil (see there for further descendants)
    • Proto-West Germanic: *mīliju (see there for further descendants)
See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Shortened from Latin mīlle passūs, mīlle passuum (Roman mile, literally a thousand of paces).

Noun edit

mīlle n

  1. a mile, particularly a Roman mile of 8 stades (stadia); 1,000 paces (passūs); or 5,000 feet (pedes)
Declension edit

Semi-indeclinable numeral.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mīlle mīlia
mīllia
Genitive mīlle mīlium
mīllium
Dative mīlle mīlibus
mīllibus
Accusative mīlle mīlia
mīllia
Ablative mīlle mīlibus
mīllibus
Vocative mīlle mīlia
mīllia
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit

References edit

  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “mīlle”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, pages 379-380
  • mille”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mille”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mille in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a mile away: a mille passibus
    • to be fined 10,000 asses: decem milibus aeris damnari
  • Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), Bern, München: Francke Verlag

Middle English edit

Noun edit

mille

  1. Alternative form of mylne

Middle French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French mile, from Latin mīlle (thousand) (plural mīlia).

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

mille (usually invariable, plural milles)

  1. thousand

Usage notes edit

  • Mille is usually invariable in phrases like quatre mille (four thousand) but the plural milles is attested.

Descendants edit

References edit

  • mille on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330–1500) (in French). See formes tab for examples of milles

Norman edit

Norman cardinal numbers
 <  999 1000 1001  > 
    Cardinal : mille

Etymology 1 edit

From Old French mile, from Latin mīlle (plural mīlia).

Numeral edit

mille

  1. (Jersey) thousand
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from English mile.

Noun edit

mille m (plural mille)

  1. (Jersey) mile

Sardinian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin mille, from Proto-Italic *smīɣeslī, from Proto-Indo-European *smih₂ǵʰéslih₂. Cognates include Italian mille and French mille.

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

mille m (plural miza)

  1. one thousand (1000)

Swedish edit

Numeral edit

mille

  1. (colloquial) Clipping of miljon.

Noun edit

mille c

  1. (colloquial) an amount of money corresponding to one million (of a given currency)
    Synonyms: miljon, kanin

Declension edit

Declension of mille 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative mille millen millar millarna
Genitive milles millens millars millarnas

References edit

Tarantino edit

Etymology edit

From Latin mille, from Proto-Italic *smīɣeslī, from Proto-Indo-European *smih₂ǵʰéslih₂. Cognates include Italian mille and French mille.

Numeral edit

mille

  1. thousand