See also: Champ, čhamp, Champ., and champ'

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See champion

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

champ (plural champs)

  1. Clipping of champion.
  2. (informal) buddy, sport, mate (as a term of address)
    Whatcha doing, champ?
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English champen, chammen (to bite; gnash the teeth), perhaps originally imitative.

 
champ (etymology 2, noun)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

champ (usually uncountable, plural champs)

  1. (Ireland) a meal of mashed potatoes and scallions

VerbEdit

champ (third-person singular simple present champs, present participle champing, simple past and past participle champed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) to bite or chew, especially noisily or impatiently.
TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From champagne by shortening.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

champ (uncountable)

  1. (informal) champagne
    • 1990, Ann Heller, "Prom Nights Often Offer Students Primer On Fine Dining", Dayton Daily News, 6 April 1990:
      "They're dressed up very elegantly and it's nice they have a glass of champ, even if it's non-alcoholic," Reif says.
    • 2009, The Lonely Island (featuring T-Pain), "I'm on a Boat", Incredibad:
      We're drinkin' Santana champ, 'cause it's so crisp
    • 2010, Tara Palmer-Tomkinson, Inheritance, Pan Books (2010), →ISBN, unnumbered page:
      'Glass of champ?' she called, skipping into the kitchen.

Etymology 4Edit

Borrowed from French champ (field). Doublet of campus and camp.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

champ (plural champs)

  1. (architecture, obsolete or rare) the field or ground on which carving appears in relief
  2. (heraldry, obsolete or rare) the field of a shield

Etymology 5Edit

Blend of church +‎ camp or back-formation from champing.

VerbEdit

champ (third-person singular simple present champs, present participle champing, simple past and past participle champed)

  1. To camp overnight in a historic church as a novelty or part of a holiday.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr
 
champ

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French champ, from Old French champ, inherited from Latin campus (field), from Proto-Indo-European *kh₂emp- (to bend, curve). Doublet of camp.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

champ m (plural champs)

  1. field in its various senses, including:
    1. a wide open space
    2. an area of study
    3. (mathematics) a vector field, tensor field, or scalar field (but not a commutative ring with identity for which every nonzero element has a multiplicative inverse, cf. corps)
    4. (heraldry) the background of a shield's design

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: champ

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin campus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

champ m (oblique plural chans, nominative singular chans, nominative plural champ)

  1. field
  2. (by extension) battlefield

DescendantsEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Late Middle English, probably imitative.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [tʃam], [tʃamp], [dʒam], [dʒamp]

VerbEdit

champ (third-person singular present champs, present participle champin, past champit, past participle champit)

  1. to mash, crush, pound
  2. to chew voraciously

Derived termsEdit

  • champer (an implement for mashing or crushing etc., a pestle)
  • champers (mashed potatoes)

NounEdit

champ (plural champs)

  1. (geography) a stretch of ground trodden into a miry state, a quagmire

WelshEdit

NounEdit

champ

  1. Aspirate mutation of camp.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
camp gamp nghamp champ
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.