See also: Champion and champión

English

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Etymology

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From Middle English champioun, from Old French champion, from Medieval Latin campio (combatant in a duel, champion), from Frankish *kampijō (fighter), from Proto-West Germanic *kampijō (combat soldier), a derivative of Proto-West Germanic *kampijan (to battle, to campaign), itself a derivative of Proto-West Germanic *kamp (battlefield, battle), ultimately a borrowing in West-Germanic from Latin campus (a field, a plain, a place of action).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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champion (plural champions)

  1. An ongoing winner in a game or contest.
    The defending champion is expected to defeat his challenger.
  2. Someone who is chosen to represent a group of people in a contest.
    Barcelona is eligible to play in FIFA Club World Cup as the champion of Europe.
  3. Someone who fights for a cause or status.
    Synonym: paladin
    Emmeline Pankhurst was a champion of women's suffrage.
    • 2012, Sue Watling, Jim Rogers, Social Work in a Digital Society, page 34:
      Specific outcomes from this policy included the appointment of a Digital Champion to drive forward the efforts to get more of the excluded to be included.
  4. Someone who fights on another's behalf.
    champion of the poor
  5. (botany) A particularly notable member of a plant species, such as one of great size.
    • 1938 November 5, Puritan Cordage Mills, “Take a Lesson from a Lily”, in Elmer C. Hole, editor, American Lumberman[1], volume 65, number 3138, Chicago, page 55:
      Pictured above is an actual photograph of a Regal Lily that famed all over the world. It's a champion plant—because in one season it produced a total of 89 blooms from one bulb, an amazing record among lilies.
    • 2013, Robin Wall Kimmerer, Braiding Sweetgrass, 1st edition, Milkweed Editions, →ISBN, →LCCN, pages 43–44:
      There was a news clipping there with a photo of a magnificent American elm, which had just been named the champion for its species, the largest of its kind.
    • 2022 February 10, Christopher Doyle, “Stockton professor, students discover largest 'champion tree' in New Jersey”, in The Press of Alantic City[2], archived from the original on 2022-02-10:
      He [Matthew Olson] was searching for red maple trees to be tapped for syrup as part of the Stockton Maple Project when he came across the new champion tree.

Hyponyms

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Derived terms

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Descendants

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Translations

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Adjective

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champion (not comparable)

  1. (attributive) Acting as a champion; having defeated all one's competitors.
  2. (attributive) Excellent; beyond compare.
  3. (predicative, Ireland, British, dialect) Excellent; brilliant; superb; deserving of high praise.
    "That rollercoaster was champion," laughed Vinny.
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Translations

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Verb

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champion (third-person singular simple present champions, present participle championing, simple past and past participle championed)

  1. (transitive) To promote, advocate, or act as a champion for (a cause, etc.).
    • 2024 April 3, Richard Foster, “Training the next generation of engineers”, in RAIL, number 1006, page 49:
      While obviously championing the Bluebell [Railway], Beardmore is keen for the 'big railway' to consider utilising what preserved railways can provide.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To challenge.

Translations

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References

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French

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old French champion, from Medieval Latin or Late Latin campiōnem, campiōnem (champion, fighter), from Frankish *kampijō, from Proto-Germanic *kampijô, based on Latin campus (level ground).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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champion m (plural champions, feminine championne)

  1. champion

Derived terms

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Descendants

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Further reading

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Middle English

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Noun

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champion

  1. Alternative form of champioun