See also: Corps

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French corps d'armée (literally army body), from Latin corpus (body). Doublet of corpse and corpus. See also English riff.

PronunciationEdit

Singular
Plural

NounEdit

corps (plural corps)

  1. (military) A battlefield formation composed of two or more divisions.
  2. An organized group of people united by a common purpose.
    • diplomatic corps
    • White House press corps
Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping.

NounEdit

corps

  1. plural of corp

AnagramsEdit


BourguignonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin corpus.

NounEdit

corps m (plural corps)

  1. body

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French corps, from Middle French cors, from Old French cors, from Latin corpus. Doublet of corpus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

corps n (plural corpsen or corpora, diminutive corpsje n)

  1. student society, especially a traditional and hierarchical one
  2. Superseded spelling of korps.

Usage notesEdit

Traditional student societies tend to prescribe the plural corpora, in regular language the plural corpsen is more common.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French cors, from Old French cors, inherited from Latin corpus (body), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱrep-. The p was added back to reflect the Latin etymology. Doublet of corpus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

corps m (plural corps)

  1. body
  2. (mathematics) field (in abstract algebra)
  3. (military) corps

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Karipúna Creole French:
  • Danish: korps
  • English: corps
  • Dutch: corps, korps
  • German: Korps
  • Norwegian Bokmål: korps
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: korps
  • Swedish: kår

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit