See also: Campus and câmpus

English

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin campus (field). Doublet of camp and champ.

First used in its current sense in reference to Princeton University in the 1770s.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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campus (plural campuses or campusses)

  1. The grounds or property of a school, college, university, business, church, or hospital, often understood to include buildings and other structures.
    The campus is sixty hectares in size.
    • 2013 August 24, Schumpeter, “Mr Geek goes to Washington”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8850:
      From their corporate campuses on the west coast, America’s technology entrepreneurs used to ignore faraway Washington, DC—or mention the place only to chastise it for holding back innovation with excessive regulation. They have, at times, invested in the low politics of self-interested lobbying […]. Yet unlike Wall Street [] tech tycoons have remained largely aloof from the broader affairs of the nation’s capital.
    • 2019, Li Huang, James Lambert, “Another Arrow for the Quiver: A New Methodology for Multilingual Researchers”, in Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, →DOI, page 5:
      In addition to this signage there are promotional videos broadcast in English on television screens around the campus.
  2. An institution of higher education and its ambiance.
    During the late 1960s, many an American campus was in a state of turmoil.

Usage notes

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  • The Latinate plural form campi is sometimes used, particularly with respect to colleges or universities; however, it is sometimes frowned upon. By contrast, the common plural form campuses is universally accepted.

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Cebuano: kampus
  • Dutch: campus
  • German: Campus
  • Japanese: キャンパス (kyanpasu)
  • Korean: 캠퍼스 (kaempeoseu)
  • Malay: kampus

Translations

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb

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campus (third-person singular simple present campuses or campusses, present participle campusing or campussing, simple past and past participle campused or campussed)

  1. To confine (a student) to campus as a punishment.
    • 1932, The Syllabus, volume 48, page 444:
      They hold sessions regularly and “campus” women for staying out late—and they do their best campussing at those times when they are sleepiest and meanest from being out until three and four themselves the night before.
    • 1955, The Twentieth Century, volume 157, page 278:
      A secondary punishment was ‘campussing’, or confinement to a campus; and for the most trivial offences the treatment was a withering harangue from Mrs Wilmington, sometimes lasting for over an hour.
    • 1996 January 30, Maggie Smith, Evergreen School, quotee, “Attendance Issues”, in The 1996 Collection: Prepared for Sudbury Schools and Planning Groups, Framingham, Massachusetts: Sudbury Valley School Press, published August 1996, →ISBN, page 131:
      SM has been very patient but just last Friday one of them was campussed for two weeks with an automatic two day suspension if he didn't heed the campussing because of repeated contempt for fairly easy to fulfill sentences.
  2. (climbing) To use a campus board, or to climb without feet as one would on a campus board.
    • 2010, Stewart M. Green, Ian Spencer-Green, Knack Rock Climbing: A Beginner’s Guide, page 30:
      It is climbed or "campused" with only your arms and hands.
    • 2016, Eric Horst, The Rock Climber's Exercise Guide, page 159:
      Boulder campusing is a popular indoor training exercise among advanced climbers—it's also a heck of a lot of fun if you're strong enough to do it right!

Asturian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin campus. Compare the inherited doublet campu.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈkampus/, [ˈkãm.pus]
  • Rhymes: -ampus
  • Hyphenation: cam‧pus

Noun

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campus m (plural campus)

  1. campus (grounds or property of a school, etc)

Basque

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Spanish campus, from Latin campus.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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campus inan

  1. campus

Declension

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Further reading

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Catalan

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin campus.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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campus m (invariable)

  1. campus

Dutch

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Etymology

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Borrowed from English campus, from Latin campus.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈkɑm.pʏs/
  • Audio:(file)
  • Hyphenation: cam‧pus

Noun

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campus m (plural campussen, diminutive campusje n)

  1. campus

Derived terms

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French

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin campus. Doublet of camp and the inherited champ.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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campus m (plural campus)

  1. campus (grounds of a university)

Descendants

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Further reading

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Latin

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A model of the Campus Martius under the Empire.

Etymology

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Traditionally, from Proto-Italic *kampos, from Proto-Indo-European *kh₂ém-po-s, from *kh₂emp- (to bend, curve; smooth), making it an exact cognate of Lithuanian kam̃pas (corner) and Ancient Greek καμπ- (kamp-, bend). Compare camur (curved, bent) for the root without a -p- suffix.

This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.
Particularly: “Sense development: how do we get from "bend, curve" to "flat level ground"? Was this originally in reference to flatter terrain where rivers form bends and curves?”

Alternatively, perhaps an agricultural term borrowed from a substrate language; this would explain the irregular correspondences between Latin and Greek.[1]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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campus m (genitive campī); second declension

  1. Open flat level ground: a plain, a natural field.
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 4.691–692:
      ‘hoc’ ait ‘in campō’ (campumque ostendit) ‘habēbat
      rūs breve cum dūrō parca colōna virō.’
      “In this plain,” he says (and he shows me the plain), “a thrifty countrywoman was maintaining a little farm along with her sturdy husband.”
    Campus MārtiusThe Field of Mars
  2. (literary) Any flat or level surface.
    • Plautus, Trin., 4, 1, 15:
      ...campī natantēs...
  3. The comitia centuriāta, which met on the Campus Mārtius.
  4. A field of action: scope.
  5. A field of debate: a topic.
  6. An opportunity.
  7. The produce of a field.
  8. (New Latin) The campus of a university, college, or business.

Declension

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Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative campus campī
Genitive campī campōrum
Dative campō campīs
Accusative campum campōs
Ablative campō campīs
Vocative campe campī

Derived terms

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Descendants

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References

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  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) “campus”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 86

Further reading

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  • campus”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • campus”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • campus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • campus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • Lewis, Charleton & al. "campus" in A Latin Dictionary.

Portuguese

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Unadapted borrowing from Latin campus. Compare the inherited doublet campo.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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campus m (plural campi or (nonstandard) campus)

  1. campus
    • Além das unidades localizadas nos campi Pampulha e Saúde, a UFMG possui ainda outras no centro de Belo Horizonte e bairros periféricos.
      Besides units located in the Pampulha and Health campuses, UFMG has others in downtown Belo Horizonte and surrounding neighborhoods.

Romanian

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French campus, English campus, from Latin campus. Doublet of the inherited câmp.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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campus n (plural campusuri)

  1. campus

Declension

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Spanish

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin campus. Compare the inherited doublet campo.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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campus m (plural campus)

  1. campus

Further reading

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Welsh

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Etymology

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From camp (feat, accomplishment) +‎ -us.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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campus (feminine singular campus, plural campus, equative campused, comparative campusach, superlative campusaf)

  1. excellent, splendid
    Synonyms: gorchestol, rhagorol, penigamp, ardderchog, gwych

Mutation

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Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
campus gampus nghampus champus
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.