See also: Campus

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin campus ‎(field).

First used in its current sense in reference to Princeton University in the 1770s.

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

campus ‎(plural campuses)

  1. The grounds or property of a school, college, university, business, church, or hospital, often understood to include buildings and other structures.
    • 2013 August 24, Schumpeter, “Mr Geek goes to Washington”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8850:
      From their corporate campuses on the west coast, America’s technology entrepreneurs used to ignore faraway Washington, DC—or mention the place only to chastise it for holding back innovation with excessive regulation. They have, at times, invested in the low politics of self-interested lobbying […]. Yet unlike Wall Street [] tech tycoons have remained largely aloof from the broader affairs of the nation’s capital.
    The campus is sixty hectares in size.
  2. An institution of higher education and its ambiance.
    During the late 1960s, many an American campus was in a state of turmoil.

Usage notesEdit

  • The Latinate plural form campi is sometimes used, particularly with respect to colleges or universities; however, it is sometimes frowned upon. By contrast, the common plural form campuses is universally accepted.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

campus ‎(third-person singular simple present campuses, present participle campusing, simple past and past participle campused)

  1. To confine to campus as a punishment.

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin campus. Compare the inherited doublet campu.

NounEdit

campus m ‎(plural campus)

  1. campus (grounds or property of a school, etc)

CatalanEdit

NounEdit

campus m ‎(plural campus)

  1. campus

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: cam‧pus

EtymologyEdit

From English campus.

NounEdit

campus m ‎(plural campussen, diminutive campusje n)

  1. campus

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin campus. Compare the inherited doublet champ.

NounEdit

campus m ‎(plural campus)

  1. campus (of university)

External linksEdit


LatinEdit

A model of the Campus Martius under the Empire.

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *kh₂emp- ‎(to bend, curve).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

campus m ‎(genitive campī); second declension

  1. Open flat level ground: a plain, a natural field.
    Campus Martius
    The Field of Mars
  2. (literary) Any flat or level surface.
    • Plautus, Trin., 4, 1, 15:
      ...campi natantes...
  3. The comitia centuriata, which met on the Campus Martius.
  4. A field of action: scope.
  5. A field of debate: a topic.
  6. An opportunity.
  7. The produce of a field.

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative campus campī
genitive campī campōrum
dative campō campīs
accusative campum campōs
ablative campō campīs
vocative campe campī

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin campus. Compare the inherited doublet campo.

NounEdit

campus m (plural campi or campus (nonstandard))

  1. campus
    Além das unidades localizadas nos campi Pampulha e Saúde, a UFMG possui ainda outras no centro de Belo Horizonte e bairros periféricos.
    Besides units located in the Pampulha and Health campuses, UFMG has others in downtown Belo Horizonte and surrounding neighborhoods.

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin campus. Compare the inherited doublet campo.

NounEdit

campus m ‎(plural campus)

  1. campus
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