See also: chocolaté

Contents

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

chocolate (confectionery)

EtymologyEdit

Often said to come from Nahuatl xocolātl (e.g. American Heritage Dictionary 2000) or chocolatl (e.g. dictionary.com 2006), which would be derived from xococ ‎(bitter) and ātl ‎(water), with an irregular change of x to ch. However, the form xocolātl is not directly attested, and chocolatl does not appear in Nahuatl until the mid-18th century. Dakin and Wichmann (2000) propose that the chocol- element refers to a special wooden stick used to prepare chocolate, and suggest that the etymon is chicolātl, a word found in several modern Nahuatl dialects. Yet another theory is that the prefix came from Yucatec Maya chocol ‎(hot).

In any case, the word chocolate reached English via Spanish and the second element is probably the Nahuatl word ātl ‎(water).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chocolate ‎(countable and uncountable, plural chocolates)

  1. (uncountable) A food made from ground roasted cocoa beans.
    Chocolate is a very popular treat.
  2. (uncountable) A drink made by dissolving this food in boiling milk or water.
  3. (countable) A single, small piece of confectionery made from chocolate.
    He bought her some chocolates as a gift. She ate one chocolate and threw the rest away.
  4. (uncountable) A dark, reddish-brown colour/color, like that of chocolate.
    As he cooked it the whole thing turned a rich, deep chocolate.
    chocolate colour:    
  5. (countable, slang) A black person; (uncountable) blackness.
    • 1967, James David Horan, The Right Image: A Novel of the Men who Make Candidates, page 73:
      "I suppose you have some of your sweet chocolates working for you?" Barney nodded.
    • 2009, Evangeline Holloway, The Reincarnation of Love, ISBN 1465318615, page 83:
      I can consume as much of you as I want to without gaining weight. Sexy chocolate is what you are.
    • 2011, Ella Campbell, Torn: The Melissa Williams Story, ISBN 1426946406, page 69:
      “How is my sexy chocolate?” Mark says on the other end.
    • 2012, Harry Davis, My Name Is Lucas, ISBN 1469902567:
      “Yes Lucas, you're some fine sexy chocolate”, she whispered, her long dark hair covering her face and the curves bursting out of her dress.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

AdjectiveEdit

chocolate ‎(comparative more chocolate, superlative most chocolate)

  1. Made of or containing chocolate.
  2. Having a dark reddish-brown colour/color.
  3. (slang) Black (relating to any of various ethnic groups having dark pigmentation of the skin).
    • 2005, Patrick Goines, Unfinished Business, page 29:
      She was a chocolate honey with all the assets necessary to never have to work hard to pay her bills.
    • 2010, Delores J. Dillard, Papua, New Guinea, 1983, page 27:
      Therefore, African Americans complexion range from fair to mahogony. When a baby is born, it's always a mystery of the hue of the child. Sometimes the child will be as white as the slave owner or as chocolate as a great great grandparent.
    • 2011, Stephanie Stokes Oliver, Daily Cornbread, page 200:
      If you are as chocolate as an African queen, do you really think you'll look better as a bottle blonde?

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

chocolate ‎(third-person singular simple present chocolates, present participle chocolating, simple past and past participle chocolated)

  1. (transitive, rare, chiefly in the past participle) To add chocolate to; to cover (food) in chocolate.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • chocolate” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  • 2000, Karen Dakin, Søren Wichmann, ‘Cacao and Chocolate: An Uto-Aztec perspective’, Ancient Mesoamerica, vol. 11, pages 55–75.
  • 1983, Frances Karttunen, An Analytical Dictionary of Nahuatl (University of Texas Press), page 54.

External linksEdit


AsturianEdit

NounEdit

chocolate m ‎(plural chocolates)

  1. Alternative form of chicolate

FrenchEdit

GalicianEdit

NounEdit

chocolate m ‎(plural chocolates)

  1. chocolate

InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

chocolate ‎(plural chocolates)

  1. chocolate

PortugueseEdit

chocolate

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Spanish chocolate, from Classical Nahuatl [Term?], possibly from xocolātl or chocolātl (a late attestation), though the etymology is unclear. See chocolate.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chocolate m (plural chocolates)

  1. chocolate

QuotationsEdit

Derived termsEdit


SpanishEdit

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia es

chocolate

EtymologyEdit

From Classical Nahuatl, possibly from xocolātl or chocolātl (a late attestation), though the etymology is unclear. See chocolate.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chocolate m ‎(plural chocolates)

  1. chocolate (food made from cocoa beans; confectionery)
  2. (slang) hash

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Read in another language