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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Likely from North Germanic, akin to Icelandic klunni (klutz) and Old Frisian klönne (klutz). Less likely from Latin colonus (colonist, farmer), although learned awareness of this term may have influenced semantic development.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
A clown
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

clown (plural clowns)

  1. A slapstick performance artist often associated with a circus and usually characterized by bright, oversized clothing, a red nose, face paint, and a brightly colored wig.
    • 2008, Lich King, "Black Metal Sucks", Toxic Zombie Onslaught.
      Over there in Norway, the churches all burn down / Let's go dress in goth clothes and get painted like a clown
  2. A person who acts in a silly fashion.
  3. A stupid person.
    • 2013, Kim Stanley Robinson, The Gold Coast: Three Californias (Wild Shore Triptych; 2)‎[1], Tom Doherty Associates, →ISBN, page 122:
      Everything’s on the table, the specs are there in the RFP and can’t be changed by some clown in the Air Force who happens to come up with a new idea.
  4. (obsolete) A man of coarse nature and manners; an awkward fellow; an illbred person; a boor.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Philip Sidney to this entry?)
    • Timothy Nourse, Campania Foelix (1700), pp. 15–16
      [] three things ought always to be kept under: a mastiff dog, a stone horse and a clown; and really I think a snarling, cross-grained clown to be the most unlucky beast of three.
  5. (obsolete) One who works upon the soil; a rustic; a churl; a yokel.
    • Cowper
      The clown, the child of nature, without guile.
    • Samuel Johnson
      He [] began to descend to familiar questions, endeavouring to accommodate his discourse to the grossness of rustic understandings. The clowns soon found that he did not know wheat from rye, and began to despise him; one of the boys, by pretending to show him a bird's nest, decoyed him into a ditch; []

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

clown (third-person singular simple present clowns, present participle clowning, simple past and past participle clowned)

  1. (intransitive) To act in a silly or playful fashion.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English clown.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /klɑu̯n/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: clown
  • Rhymes: -ɑu̯n

NounEdit

clown m (plural clowns, diminutive clowntje n)

  1. clown (entertainer)

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English clown.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

clown m (plural clowns)

  1. clown (performer)
  2. clown (person who acts in a comic way)

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

NounEdit

clown m (invariable)

  1. clown (artist)

SynonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English clown.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

clown m (plural clownes)

  1. clown (circus performance artist)

SynonymsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English clown.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

clown c

  1. clown

DeclensionEdit

Declension of clown 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative clown clownen clowner clownerna
Genitive clowns clownens clowners clownernas

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from English clown.

NounEdit

clown m (plural clowniaid)

  1. clown

Etymology 2Edit

Alternative formsEdit

  • closwn (colloquial, first-person singular conditional)

VerbEdit

clown

  1. first-person plural present/future of cloi
  2. first-person singular imperfect/conditional of cloi
  3. (literary) first-person plural imperative of cloi

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
clown glown nghlown chlown
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.