See also: August

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From French auguste (noble, stately; august) or Latin augustus (majestic, venerable, august; imperial, royal),[1] from augeō (to augment, increase; to enlarge, expand, spread). Doublet of Augustus.

Adjective

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august (comparative auguster or more august, superlative augustest or most august)

  1. Awe-inspiring, majestic, noble, venerable.
    an august patron of the arts
    • 1796, Gilbert Bishop of Sarum [i.e., Gilbert Burnet], “Article VII. Of the Old Testament.”, in An Exposition of the XXXIX Articles of the Church of England, Oxford: At the Clarendon Press, →OCLC, page 123:
      In the book of Pſalms there are many things ſaid of David, which ſeem capable of a much auguſter ſenſe than can be pretended to be anſwered by any thing that befel himſelf.
    • 1837 August 31, William Sollis, A Sermon, Preached in Holsworthy Church on Thursday, August 31, 1837, at the Anniversaries of the Societies for Promoting Christian Knowledge, and for Propagating the Gospel in Foreign Parts. [], Launceston, Cornwall: Penheale-Press, Rev. H. A. Simcoe, →OCLC, page 7:
      [W]e shall not, I think, be able to find language which can convey in few words more fully the idea we should always have impressed on our minds of the august character of our Lord, than the expression, "the word of life."
    • 1841, E[lijah] C[oleman] Bridgman, “Governmental Affairs”, in A Chinese Chrestomathy in the Canton Dialect, Macao: S[amuel] Wells Williams, →OCLC, section second (Imperial Titles), page 558:
      The commands of the august sovereign are the imperial commands, or the phœnix (the incomparable) mandate.
    • 1846, Robert Browning, “Luria”, in Bells and Pomegranates, volumes VIII (Luria; and A Soul’s Tragedy), London: Edward Moxon, →OCLC; republished in Poems [...] In Two Volumes, new edition, volume II, London: Chapman & Hall, [], 1849, →OCLC, act IV, page 192:
      —Inconsciously to the augustest end / Thou hast arisen: second not in rank / So much as time, to him who first ordained / That Florence, thou art to destroy, should be— []
    • 1899, Sei Shōnagon, “Makura Zōshi [The Attack of the Dog Okinamaro upon the Cat Miyōbu no Otodo]”, in W[illiam] G[eorge] Aston, A History of Japanese Literature, London: William Heinemann, →OCLC, page 111:
      The foolish dog [] flew at the cat, who in her fright and consternation took refuge behind the screen of the breakfast-room where his Majesty then was. The Mikado was greatly shocked and agitated. He took the cat into his august bosom, and summoning the chamberlain Tadataka, gave orders that Okinamaro should have a good thrashing and be banished to Dog Island at once.
    • 2015 December 5, Alan Smith, “Leicester City back on top as Riyad Mahrez hat-trick downs Swansea City”, in The Guardian[1], London, archived from the original on 29 March 2017:
      For once the story was not about Jamie Vardy, unable to equal Jimmy Dunne's top-flight record of scoring in a dozen consecutive games, but about his august deputy Riyad Mahrez.
    • 2016, Liu Cixin, translated by Ken Liu, Death's End, Tor, translation of 死神永生, →ISBN, page 280:
      Countless proposals flooded in, sent by sources as august as the World Academy of Sciences and as humble as elementary schools.
  2. Of noble birth.
    an august lineage
    • 1873, Walter Fitz Patrick, chapter I, in The Great Condé and the Period of the Fronde: A Historical Sketch, volume I, London: T[homas] Cautley Newby, publisher, [], →OCLC, page 7:
      A branch of the house of Lorraine, in comparison with which even the royal race of Capet was mean, the Guises traced back their august lineage through a long line of warrior princes to the Imperial figure of Charlemagne.
Derived terms
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Translations
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Etymology 2

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From August.

Verb

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august (third-person singular simple present augusts, present participle augusting, simple past and past participle augusted)

  1. (obsolete, rare) To make ripe; ripen.
  2. (obsolete, rare) To bring to realization.
    • 1855, Philip James Bailey, The Mystic and Other Poems, London: Chapman and Hall, [], →OCLC, page 55:
      By divine science and cœlestial art / He for the cause of the dear nations toiled, / And augusted man's heavenly hopes that so, / [] / he might, by awful rites / [] / Adhæsion with Divinity achieve.
Translations
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Etymology 3

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Noun

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august (plural augusts)

  1. Alternative form of auguste (kind of clown)

References

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Anagrams

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Catalan

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin augustus. Doublet of agost, which was inherited through Vulgar Latin.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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august (feminine augusta, masculine plural augusts or augustos, feminine plural augustes)

  1. august (venerable, noble)

Derived terms

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Further reading

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Danish

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin augustus.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /avˈɡost/, [ɑwˈɡ̊ɔsd̥], [ɑ̈wˈkɔ̽st]

Noun

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august c

  1. August (the eighth month of the Gregorian calendar)

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Estonian

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Estonian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia et

Etymology

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Borrowed from German August.

Noun

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august (genitive augusti, partitive augustit)

  1. August

Inflection

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Declension of august (ÕS type 2/õpik, no gradation)
singular plural
nominative august augustid
accusative nom.
gen. augusti
genitive augustite
partitive augustit augusteid
illative augustisse augustitesse
augusteisse
inessive augustis augustites
augusteis
elative augustist augustitest
augusteist
allative augustile augustitele
augusteile
adessive augustil augustitel
augusteil
ablative augustilt augustitelt
augusteilt
translative augustiks augustiteks
augusteiks
terminative augustini augustiteni
essive augustina augustitena
abessive augustita augustiteta
comitative augustiga augustitega

Synonyms

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Faroese

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin augustus.

Noun

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august m

  1. August (month of the Gregorian calendar)

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Interlingua

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Noun

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august (plural augustes)

  1. Alternative form of augusto

Kashubian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from German August.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /aˈuɡust/
  • Rhymes: -uɡust
  • Syllabification: a‧u‧gust

Noun

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august m inan

  1. August
    Synonym: zélnik

Further reading

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  • Jan Trepczyk (1994) “sierpień”, in Słownik polsko-kaszubski (in Kashubian), volumes 1–2

North Frisian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin augustus.

Noun

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august m

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) August

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Norwegian Bokmål

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Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin augustus.

Noun

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august (indeclinable)

  1. August (eighth month of the year)

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References

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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin augustus.

Noun

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august m (indeclinable)

  1. August (eighth month)

References

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Romanian

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Etymology 1

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Borrowed from Latin (mensis) augustus. Cf. also the inherited doublet agust and gust.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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august m (uncountable)

  1. August
Synonyms
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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from French auguste.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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august m or n (feminine singular augustă, masculine plural auguști, feminine and neuter plural auguste)

  1. august, majestic, venerable
    Synonyms: slăvit, preamărit
Declension
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Serbo-Croatian

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin augustus.

Noun

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august m (Cyrillic spelling аугуст)

  1. (Bosnia) August
    Synonym: (Croatia) kolovoz

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Slovak

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin augustus.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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august m inan (genitive singular augusta, nominative plural augusty, genitive plural augustov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. August

Declension

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Derived terms

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Further reading

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  • august”, in Slovníkový portál Jazykovedného ústavu Ľ. Štúra SAV [Dictionary portal of the Ľ. Štúr Institute of Linguistics, Slovak Academy of Science] (in Slovak), https://slovnik.juls.savba.sk, 2024

Sundanese

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Dutch augustus or English August

Noun

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august

  1. (dated, possibly obsolete) August

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