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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French auguste (noble, stately; august) or Latin augustus (majestic, venerable, august; imperial, royal),[1] from augeō (to augment, increase; to enlarge, expand, spread), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ewg- (to enlarge, increase).

AdjectiveEdit

august (comparative auguster or more august, superlative augustest or most august)

  1. Awe-inspiring, majestic, noble, venerable.
    an august patron of the arts
    • 1796, Gilbert Bishop of Sarum [i.e., Gilbert Burnet], “Article VII. Of the Old Testament.”, in An Exposition of the XXXIX Articles of the Church of England, Oxford: At the Clarendon Press, OCLC 191672588, page 123:
      In the book of Pſalms there are many things ſaid of David, which ſeem capable of a much auguſter ſenſe than can be pretended to be anſwered by any thing that befel himſelf.
    • 1837 August 31, William Sollis, A Sermon, Preached in Holsworthy Church on Thursday, August 31, 1837, at the Anniversaries of the Societies for Promoting Christian Knowledge, and for Propagating the Gospel in Foreign Parts. [], Launceston, Cornwall: Penheale-Press, Rev. H. A. Simcoe, OCLC 31888331, page 7:
      [W]e shall not, I think, be able to find language which can convey in few words more fully the idea we should always have impressed on our minds of the august character of our Lord, than the expression, "the word of life."
    • 1841, E[lijah] C[oleman] Bridgman, “Governmental Affairs”, in A Chinese Chrestomathy in the Canton Dialect, Macao: S[amuel] Wells Williams, OCLC 806406066, section second (Imperial Titles), page 558:
      The commands of the august sovereign are the imperial commands, or the phœnix (the incomparable) mandate.
    • 1846, Robert Browning, “Luria”, in Bells and Pomegranates, volume VIII (Luria; and A Soul’s Tragedy), London: Edward Moxon, OCLC 793033490; republished in Poems [...] In Two Volumes, volume II, new edition, London: Chapman & Hall, [], 1849, OCLC 1145736, Act IV, page 192:
      —Inconsciously to the augustest end / Thou hast arisen: second not in rank / So much as time, to him who first ordained / That Florence, thou art to destroy, should be— []
    • 1899, Sei Shōnagon, “Makura Zōshi [The Attack of the Dog Okinamaro upon the Cat Miyōbu no Otodo]”, in W[illiam] G[eorge] Aston, A History of Japanese Literature, London: William Heinemann, OCLC 912202873, page 111:
      The foolish dog [] flew at the cat, who in her fright and consternation took refuge behind the screen of the breakfast-room where his Majesty then was. The Mikado was greatly shocked and agitated. He took the cat into his august bosom, and summoning the chamberlain Tadataka, gave orders that Okinamaro should have a good thrashing and be banished to Dog Island at once.
    • 2015 December 5, Alan Smith, “Leicester City back on top as Riyad Mahrez hat-trick downs Swansea City”, in The Guardian[1], London, archived from the original on 29 March 2017:
      For once the story was not about Jamie Vardy, unable to equal Jimmy Dunne's top-flight record of scoring in a dozen consecutive games, but about his august deputy Riyad Mahrez.
  2. Of noble birth.
    an august lineage
    • 1873, Walter Fitz Patrick, chapter I, in The Great Condé and the Period of the Fronde: A Historical Sketch, volume I, London: T[homas] Cautley Newby, publisher, [], OCLC 3251659, page 7:
      A branch of the house of Lorraine, in comparison with which even the royal race of Capet was mean, the Guises traced back their august lineage through a long line of warrior princes to the Imperial figure of Charlemagne.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From August.

VerbEdit

august (third-person singular simple present augusts, present participle augusting, simple past and past participle augusted)

  1. (obsolete, rare) To make ripe; ripen.
  2. (obsolete, rare) To bring to realization.
    • 1855, Philip James Bailey, The Mystic and Other Poems, London: Chapman and Hall, [], OCLC 1988592, page 55:
      By divine science and cœlestial art / He for the cause of the dear nations toiled, / And augusted man's heavenly hopes that so, / [] / he might, by awful rites / [] / Adhæsion with Divinity achieve.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin augustus. Doublet of agost, which was inherited through Vulgar Latin.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

august (feminine augusta, masculine plural augusts or augustos, feminine plural augustes)

  1. august (venerable, noble)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin augustus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /avɡɔst/, [ɑwˈɡ̊ɔsd̥]

NounEdit

august c

  1. August (the eighth month of the Gregorian calendar)

See alsoEdit


EstonianEdit

 
Estonian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia et

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German August.

NounEdit

august (genitive augusti, partitive augustit)

  1. August

InflectionEdit

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin augustus.

NounEdit

august m

  1. August (month of the Gregorian calendar)

See alsoEdit


InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

august (plural augustes)

  1. August

InterlingueEdit

NounEdit

august

  1. August

North FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin augustus.

NounEdit

august m

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) August

See alsoEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin augustus.

NounEdit

august (indeclinable)

  1. August (eighth month of the year)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin augustus.

NounEdit

august m (indeclinable)

  1. August (eighth month)

ReferencesEdit


RomanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin (mensis) augustus. Cf. also the inherited doublet agust, gust.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

august m (uncountable)

  1. August
SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French auguste.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

august m, n (feminine singular augustă, masculine plural auguști, feminine and neuter plural auguste)

  1. august, majestic, venerable
DeclensionEdit
SynonymsEdit

Serbo-CroatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin augustus.

NounEdit

august m (Cyrillic spelling аугуст)

  1. (Bosnia) August

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


SlovakEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin augustus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

august m (genitive singular augusta, nominative plural augusty, genitive plural augustov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. August

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

  • august in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

SundaneseEdit

NounEdit

august

  1. August