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PronunciationEdit

Children practising karate in the dojo (sense 1) of the Jack and Jill School in Bacolod City, Philippines
The electronics laboratory at Hacker Dojo, a dojo (sense 2) or hackerspace in Mountain View, California, USA

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Japanese 道場 (dōjō, literally place of the ways).

NounEdit

dojo (plural dojos or dojo)

  1. (martial arts) A training facility, usually led by one or more sensei; a hall or room used for such training.
    • 1965 October, Dean Nelson, “Finland Welcomes Karateman”, in Norman Fogel, editor, Black Belt: Magazine of the Martial Arts, volume III, number 10, Los Angeles, Calif.: Black Belt, Inc., ISSN 0277-3066, OCLC 42341974, page 47:
      I was to be there [Helsinki, Finland] for over two weeks; and because a hotel room affords a rather awkward place of practice, I went looking for a dojo. Finally after hearing rumors of dojos from various citizens I turned to the equivalent of Helsinki's Yellow Pages. There I found listed, under Meido-Kan, the name of one Kare K. Käyhkö.
    • 1971, Fumio Demura, “About the Author”, in Nunchaku: Karate Weapon of Self-defense, Los Angeles, Calif.: Black Belt Books, Ohara Publications, published 2005, →ISBN, page 6:
      When his teacher moved from the area, Mr. Demura was relocated to another dojo which taught both karate and kendo.
    • 1974, Tonny Tulleners, “Want to Learn Karate?”, in Beginning Karate, Santa Clarita, Calif.: Ohara Publications, →ISBN, page 12:
      Most dojo, unless they maintain a group coverage for their students, will require you to sign a waiver before you begin attending class.
    • 2012 November 26, Reese Rigby, “Proper Dojo Etiquette”, in They Call Me Sensei, Bloomington, Ind.: AuthorHouse, →ISBN, page 6:
      The first thing the students had to do when they entered the dojo was to rei (bow) to the floor. This showed respect for the dojo, treating it with humbleness.
  2. (by extension) A room or other facility used for other activities, such as meditation or software development.
    • 2014, Deborah Perry Piscione, “Improvisational Innovation: Two Words that Will Turn Employee Ideas into Execution”, in The Risk Factor: Why Every Organization Needs Big Bets, Bold Characters, and the Occasional Spectacular Failure, New York, N.Y.: Palgrave Macmillan, →ISBN, part II (The DNA of a Bold Risk-taker), page 117:
      Earlier dojos were known as homebrew clubs. [...] In Silicon Valley, a dojo is defined as a do-ocracy where people come together based on shared interests and passions, such as coding and robotics. [...] David Crawley, a semiconductor physicist and founder of Hacker Dojo Robotics, shared with me that it had been a passion of his to pull robotics hobbyists together with 12 challenges in mind: drive around three cones, deliver a pizza from the front door of the dojo to a predetermined location inside, [...]
    • 2018 August 23, Helen Beal, “The State of DevOps in Banking – Report from DOES London 2018”, in InfoQ[1], archived from the original on 15 May 2019:
      By bringing the people across their value streams closer together, physically, and by using the dojo environment to experiment with new ways of working, [Aimee] Bechtle and [John] Schmidt claimed they have achieved a state of "no fear change". [...] Both times they set up the dojo, Schmidt said, "This is going to be messy"; they were creating a psychologically safe environment in which the team could experiment.
    • 2018 August 29, Mark Schilling, “‘The Miracle of Crybaby Shottan’: It’s never too late to make your move [film review]”, in The Japan Times[2], Tokyo: News2u Holdings, ISSN 0447-5763, OCLC 21225620, archived from the original on 30 August 2018:
      We first see [Shōji] Segawa as a shy boy good at shogi, which makes him a nerd in the eyes of some [...] Then, at the urging of his kindly father (Jun Kunimura), Segawa tests himself against adult opponents at a shogi dojo – a smoke-filled lair presided over by a grizzled master (Issey Ogata) who recognizes the [boy's] ability and urges them to apply to the Shogi Federation’s training academy for future pros.
  3. (sumo) Synonym of dohyo (the ring in which a sumo wrestling match is held)
    • 2017 September 3, Martin Love, “Toyota Hilux pick-up review: ‘A work horse, not a fashion pony’”, in Katharine Viner, editor, The Guardian[3], London: Guardian News & Media, ISSN 0261-3077, OCLC 229952407, archived from the original on 5 October 2018:
      In this class of truck it’s all about torque, and the Hilux has that in spades. [...] Its traction control stamps the ground with the immovable authority of a sumo wrestler entering the dojo.
    • 2019 January 16, “Sumo: Kisenosato, only current yokozuna born in Japan, retires”, in Pakistan Today, Lahore: Arif Nizami, ISSN 1098-8424, OCLC 692170356:
      Women [...] considered "impure", are not allowed on the dojo, circular location of the fight considered a sacred place. The inflexibility of the sumo world on this point had caused a scandal last year when women doctors and nurses had come to the dojo to help an elected official feeling uncomfortable during a speech at a tournament. The sumo association had to present "sincere apologies" for asking them to come down as soon as possible.
    • 2019 July 27, Declan McVeigh, “Hakkaku stable: How to watch Tokyo’s sumo stars train live”, in The National[4], Abu Dhabi: International Media Investments, OCLC 237124878, archived from the original on 29 July 2019:
      Most stables are off-limits but Hakkaku's allows paying guests accompanied by a guide to watch a morning training session. Because sumo competitions are held just six times a year, it's a great way for visitors to experience this uniquely Japanese phenomenon. [...] Guests silently shuffle into the small dojo to sit or kneel just feet from where the enormous fighters are practising.
    • 2019 October 2, Claudiu Pop, “Djokovic Tried Sumo Wrestling before Japan Open, but Failed to Impress”, in Tennis World[5], archived from the original on 8 October 2019:
      Novak Djokovic had fought against other sumo players in a dojo before he started Japan Open, but the tennis champion was clearly out of his league. [...] "I had a slight weight deficit but I was very close to moving the guy an inch. They say they eat at least 10.000 calories a day to be strong and big. Don't know if I can match that to be honest", Nole commented on his poor performance in the dojo.
Alternative formsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

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TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Japanese 泥鰌 (dojō, pond loach).

NounEdit

dojo

  1. The dojo loach, Japanese weather loach, or pond loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus), a freshwater fish native to East Asia.
    • 1878 January 26, H[enry] Faulds, “Remarks on the Dojô”, in Transactions of the Asiatic Society of Japan, volume VI, part I, Yokohama: Printed at the “Japan Mail” Office, OCLC 10807228, page 183:
      The head of the dojô is small, the mouth is surrounded by six or eight barbules as is the case with several species of fish which inhabit muddy streams. [...] A microscopic examination showed them [the barbules] to be rich in muscular fibres for movement, and through the centre run a thick bundle of very delicate nerve fibres which spread out on the surface of each barbule's tip. These, I suppose from the manner which the dojô dips its head down, assist in the search for food, [...]
    • 1971, Robert M. Howland, editor, Sport Fishery Abstracts, volume 16, number 1, Narragansett, R.I.: Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior, ISSN 0038-786X, OCLC 1641708, abstract 13071, page 68:
      [A] comparative test on susceptibility to E1-43, 064 between the goldfish and ‘Dojo’ fish was made by dipping method. The result has shown that the ‘Dojo’ fish is 5.32 times as susceptible as the goldfish to E1-43, 064.
    • 2007, John R. K. Clark, “Jizo the Protector”, in Guardian of the Sea: Jizo in Hawaiʻi (Latitude 20 Book), Honolulu, Hi.: University of Hawaiʻi Press, →ISBN, page 51:
      All of us kids used to swim in the stream and fish for dojo, funa, and goby.
TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From Japanese 道場 (dōjō, place of the way)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dojo m (plural dojos)

  1. (martial arts) dojo

IndonesianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Japanese 道場 (どうじょう, dōjō, literally place of the ways): (どう, , road; way) + (じょう, , place; place where events are held; flattened area for ceremonies or festivals).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /do.d͡ʒo/
  • Hyphenation: do‧jo

NounEdit

dojo (plural dojo-dojo, first-person possessive dojoku, second-person possessive dojomu, third-person possessive dojonya)

  1. (martial arts) A training facility, usually led by one or more sensei; a hall or room used for such training.

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Japanese 道場 (dōjō, place of the way)

NounEdit

dojo n (indeclinable)

  1. dojo (a place where martial arts are practiced)

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

dojo m (plural dojos)

  1. (martial arts) dojo