EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dɹɛdʒ/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛdʒ

Etymology 1Edit

 
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From Scots dreg-boat, dreg-bot (from Old English *dreċġ); or alternatively from Middle Dutch dregghe (drag-net), probably ultimately from the same root as drag.

NounEdit

dredge (plural dredges)

  1. Any instrument used to gather or take by dragging; as:
    1. A dragnet for taking up oysters, etc., from their beds.
    2. A dredging machine.
    3. An iron frame, with a fine net attached, used in collecting animals living at the bottom of the sea.
  2. Very fine mineral matter held in suspension in water[1].
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

dredge (third-person singular simple present dredges, present participle dredging, simple past and past participle dredged)

  1. To make a channel deeper or wider using a dredge.
  2. To bring something to the surface with a dredge.
  3. (Usually with up) to unearth.
    to dredge up someone's unsavoury past
    • 2017 May 13, Barney Ronay, “Antonio Conte’s brilliance has turned Chelsea’s pop-up team into champions”, in the Guardian[1]:
      Friday night’s crowning victory at The Hawthorns was the 25th in 30 league matches since Antonio Conte’s decisive re-gearing of his team in September, the tactical switches that have coaxed such a thrilling run from this team of bolt-ons and upcycled squad players, most notably Victor Moses, who was dredged out of the laundry bin in the autumn to become a key part of the title surge.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English dragge, from Old French dragee, dragie, from Latin tragēmata, from Ancient Greek τραγήματα (tragḗmata, spices), plural of τράγημα (trágēma, dried fruit).

 
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NounEdit

dredge (countable and uncountable, plural dredges)

  1. (cooking, countable) A large shaker for sprinkling spices or seasonings during food preparation.
  2. (uncountable) A mixture of oats and barley.
    Synonym: bullimong
    • 1991, Edward Miller, ‎Joan Thirsk, The Agrarian History of England and Wales: Volume 3, 1348-1500
      It is true that on the boulder clay of south Cambridgeshire they grew dredge, a mixture of oats and barley

VerbEdit

dredge (third-person singular simple present dredges, present participle dredging, simple past and past participle dredged)

  1. (cooking, transitive) To sprinkle (food) with spices or seasonings, using a dredge.
    Dredge the meat with the flour mixture you prepared earlier.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 1881, Rossiter W. Raymond, A Glossary of Mining and Metallurgical Terms