EnglishEdit

 
Dusk

EtymologyEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dʌsk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌsk

NounEdit

dusk (countable and uncountable, plural dusks)

  1. A period of time at the end of day when the sun is below the horizon but before the full onset of night, especially the darker part of twilight.
  2. A darkish colour.
  3. The condition of being dusky; duskiness

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VerbEdit

dusk (third-person singular simple present dusks, present participle dusking, simple past and past participle dusked)

  1. (intransitive) To begin to lose light or whiteness; to grow dusk.
    • 1936, Alfred Edward Housman, More Poems[1], XXXIII, lines 25-27:
      I see the air benighted
      And all the dusking dales,
      And lamps in England lighted,
  2. (transitive) To make dusk.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dusk (comparative dusker, superlative duskest)

  1. Tending to darkness or blackness; moderately dark or black; dusky.

See alsoEdit

  • dusk at OneLook Dictionary Search

AnagramsEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dusk

  1. Alternative form of dosk