EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Early 17th century, borrowed from Medieval Latin faciālis (face-to-face, direct, open), from faciēs (form, configuration, figure; face, visage, countenance) +‎ -ālis (-al, adjectival suffix).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfeɪ.ʃəl/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃəl

AdjectiveEdit

facial (not comparable)

  1. (relational) Of or affecting the face.
  2. (medicine, relational) Concerned with or used in improving the appearance of the face.
  3. (transferred sense, law) (of a law or regulation validity) On its face; as it appears (as opposed to, as it is applied).
    The facial constitutionality of the law is in question.

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

facial (plural facials)

  1. (medicine) A personal care beauty treatment which involves cleansing and moisturizing of the human face.
  2. (film) A kind of early silent film focusing on the facial expressions of the actor.
    • 2004, Simon Popple; Joe Kember, Early Cinema: From Factory Gate to Dream Factory[But in facials, moving picture technology also enabled an exaggeration of this performance tradition, bringing a new emphasis to the details [] ], page 92:
  3. (slang, sports) (in some contact sports) A foul play which involves one player hitting another in the face.
  4. (slang, sex) A sex act of male ejaculation onto another person's face.
    He gave his wife a creamy facial.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin faciālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

facial (masculine and feminine plural facials)

  1. facial
    músculs facials
    facial muscles

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin faciālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

facial (feminine singular faciale, masculine plural faciaux, feminine plural faciales)

  1. facial

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin faciālis.

AdjectiveEdit

facial m or f (plural faciais, comparable)

  1. facial (of the face)

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French facial

AdjectiveEdit

facial m or n (feminine singular facială, masculine plural faciali, feminine and neuter plural faciale)

  1. facial

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin faciālis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /faˈθjal/, [faˈθjal]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /faˈsjal/, [faˈsjal]

AdjectiveEdit

facial (plural faciales)

  1. facial

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit