haven

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English haven, havene, from Old English hæfen ‎(haven; harbour; port), from Proto-Germanic *habnō, *habanō (compare Dutch haven, German Hafen, Danish/Norwegian havn), from Proto-Germanic *habą ‎(sea) (compare Old English hæf, Middle Low German haf, Old Norse haf ‎(sea), German Haff ‎(bay or lagoon behind a spit), perhaps, in the sense of "heaving sea", etymologically identical with Old Norse haf ‎(heaving, lifting, uplift, elevation), derived from Proto-Germanic *habjaną ‎(to lift, heave)), or from Proto-Indo-European *kopno- (compare Irish cúan 'harbor, recess, haven').

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

haven ‎(plural havens)

  1. A harbour or anchorage protected from the sea.
    • Shakespeare
      what shipping and what lading's in our haven
    • Tennyson
      their haven under the hill
  2. (by extension) A place of safety; a refuge or sanctuary.
    • 2011 December 21, Helen Pidd, “Europeans migrate south as continent drifts deeper into crisis”[1], the Guardian:
      Since its conception, the European Union has been a haven for those seeking refuge from war, persecution and poverty in other parts of the world.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

haven ‎(third-person singular simple present havens, present participle havening, simple past and past participle havened)

  1. To put into, or provide with a haven.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

haven c

  1. singular definite of have

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch havene, from Old Dutch *havana, from Proto-Germanic *habnō, *habanō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

haven f ‎(plural havens, diminutive haventje n)

  1. harbour
  2. port

Derived termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English habban, hafian.

VerbEdit

haven

  1. to have

ConjugationEdit

DescendantsEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

haven

  1. definite plural of hav
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