See also: Hind

English

edit
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation

edit
  • IPA(key): /haɪnd/
  • Audio (US):(file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪnd

Etymology 1

edit

From Middle English hinde, from Old English hindan (at the rear, from behind), Proto-Germanic *hinder (behind, beyond), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱem-ta- (down, below, with, far, along, against), from *ḱóm (beside, near, by, with). Cognate with Gothic 𐌷𐌹𐌽𐌳𐌰𐌽𐌰 (hindana, from beyond), Old Norse hindr (obstacle), Old Norse handan (from that side, beyond), Old High German hintana (behind), Old English hinder (behind, back, in the farthest part, down), Latin contra (in return, against). More at hinder, contrary.

Adjective

edit

hind (comparative hinder, superlative hindmost)

  1. Located at the rear (most often said of animals' body parts).
  2. Backward; to the rear.
Derived terms
edit
Translations
edit

Etymology 2

edit
Wikispecies has information on:

Wikispecies From Middle English hind, hinde, hynde, from Old English hind, Proto-West Germanic *hindu, from Proto-Germanic *hindō, *hindiz, from a formation on Proto-Indo-European *ḱem- (hornless). Cognate with Dutch hinde, German Hinde, Danish hind.

Noun

edit

hind (plural hinds)

  1. A female deer, especially a red deer at least two years old.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, →OCLC, partition III, section 1, member 3:
      Nature binds all creatures to love their young ones; an hen to preserve her brood will run upon a lion, an hind will fight with a bull, a sow with a bear, a silly sheep with a fox.
    • 1769, Firishta, translated by Alexander Dow, Tales translated from the Persian of Inatulla of Delhi, volume I, Dublin: P. and W. Wilson et al., page v:
      The ſpring diſplaying her elegant taſte, the proud walk of the gold-feathered pheaſant, the light tread of the ſmall-hoofed hind, and the dancing of the ſtar-trained peacock, infuſed joy into the ſoul of the ſpectator of the aſtoniſhing works of the Creator.
  2. A spotted food fish of the genus Epinephelus.
Synonyms
edit
  • (female deer): doe
Derived terms
edit
Translations
edit

Etymology 3

edit

From Middle English hynd, hine, from Old English hī(ġ)na, genitive plural of hīġa (servant, family member), in the phrase hīna fæder ‘paterfamilias’. The -d is a later addition (compare sound). Compare Old Frisian hinde (servant).

Noun

edit

hind (plural hinds)

  1. (archaic) A servant, especially an agricultural labourer.
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, “Of the Parcimony of Our Forefathers”, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes [], book I, London: [] Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount [], →OCLC, page 167:
      Attilius Regulus [] writ vnto the common-wealth, that a hynde, or plough-boy whom he had left alone to over-ſee and husband his land (which in all was but ſeaven acres of ground) was run away from his charge [].
    • 1792, Robert Bowmaker, “Number LI. Parish of Dunse, (County of Berwick.)”, in John Sinclair, editor, The Statistical Account of Scotland. Drawn Up from the Communications of the Ministers of the Different Parishes, volume IV, Edinburgh: Printed and sold by William Creech [et al.], →OCLC, page 386:
      The farmers ſervants who have families, and engage by the year, are called hinds, and receive 10 bolls oats, 2 bolls barley, and 1 boll peas, which two laſt articles are called hummel corn, []
    • 1827, Maria Elizabeth Budden, Nina, An Icelandic Tale[1], page 41:
      The peaceful tenour of Nina's life was interrupted one morning by the mysterious looks and whisperings of her maids and hinds.
    • 1931, Pearl S. Buck, The Good Earth:
      that my brother can sit at leisure in a seat and learn something and I must work like a hind, who am your son as well as he!
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:hind.

References

edit

Anagrams

edit

Azerbaijani

edit

Etymology

edit

Borrowed from Classical Persian هند (hind). Cognate with Turkish Hint, Uzbek hind.

Noun

edit

hind (definite accusative hindi, plural hindlər)

  1. (uncommon nowadays) Indian (person from India)
    Synonyms: hindli, (Classical Azerbaijani) hindi
  2. (in izafet II compounds)
    1. Hindi
      hind diliHindi language
    2. Indian (of or relating to India)

Declension

edit
    Declension of hind
singular plural
nominative hind
hindlər
definite accusative hindi
hindləri
dative hində
hindlərə
locative hinddə
hindlərdə
ablative hinddən
hindlərdən
definite genitive hindin
hindlərin
    Possessive forms of hind
nominative
singular plural
mənim (my) hindim hindlərim
sənin (your) hindin hindlərin
onun (his/her/its) hindi hindləri
bizim (our) hindimiz hindlərimiz
sizin (your) hindiniz hindləriniz
onların (their) hindi or hindləri hindləri
accusative
singular plural
mənim (my) hindimi hindlərimi
sənin (your) hindini hindlərini
onun (his/her/its) hindini hindlərini
bizim (our) hindimizi hindlərimizi
sizin (your) hindinizi hindlərinizi
onların (their) hindini or hindlərini hindlərini
dative
singular plural
mənim (my) hindimə hindlərimə
sənin (your) hindinə hindlərinə
onun (his/her/its) hindinə hindlərinə
bizim (our) hindimizə hindlərimizə
sizin (your) hindinizə hindlərinizə
onların (their) hindinə or hindlərinə hindlərinə
locative
singular plural
mənim (my) hindimdə hindlərimdə
sənin (your) hindində hindlərində
onun (his/her/its) hindində hindlərində
bizim (our) hindimizdə hindlərimizdə
sizin (your) hindinizdə hindlərinizdə
onların (their) hindində or hindlərində hindlərində
ablative
singular plural
mənim (my) hindimdən hindlərimdən
sənin (your) hindindən hindlərindən
onun (his/her/its) hindindən hindlərindən
bizim (our) hindimizdən hindlərimizdən
sizin (your) hindinizdən hindlərinizdən
onların (their) hindindən or hindlərindən hindlərindən
genitive
singular plural
mənim (my) hindimin hindlərimin
sənin (your) hindinin hindlərinin
onun (his/her/its) hindinin hindlərinin
bizim (our) hindimizin hindlərimizin
sizin (your) hindinizin hindlərinizin
onların (their) hindinin or hindlərinin hindlərinin

Derived terms

edit

Further reading

edit
  • hind” in Obastan.com.

Danish

edit

Etymology

edit

From Old Norse hind, from Proto-Germanic *hindiz.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

hind c (singular definite hinden, plural indefinite hinder or hinde)

  1. hind (female deer)

Inflection

edit

Estonian

edit

Etymology

edit

From Proto-Finnic *hinta. Cognate with Finnish hinta.

Noun

edit

hind (genitive hinna, partitive hinda)

  1. price

Declension

edit
Declension of hind (ÕS type 22u/leib, d-n gradation)
singular plural
nominative hind hinnad
accusative nom.
gen. hinna
genitive hindade
partitive hinda hindu
hindasid
illative hinda
hinnasse
hindadesse
hinnusse
inessive hinnas hindades
hinnus
elative hinnast hindadest
hinnust
allative hinnale hindadele
hinnule
adessive hinnal hindadel
hinnul
ablative hinnalt hindadelt
hinnult
translative hinnaks hindadeks
hinnuks
terminative hinnani hindadeni
essive hinnana hindadena
abessive hinnata hindadeta
comitative hinnaga hindadega

Faroese

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Etymology 1

edit

From Old Norse hinna.

Noun

edit

hind f (genitive singular hindar, plural hindir)

  1. membrane
Declension
edit
Declension of hind
f2 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative hind hindin hindir hindirnar
accusative hind hindina hindir hindirnar
dative hind hindini hindum hindunum
genitive hindar hindarinnar hinda hindanna
Synonyms
edit

Etymology 2

edit

From Old Norse hind, from Proto-Germanic *hindiz.

Noun

edit

hind f (genitive singular hindar, plural hindir)

  1. hind (female deer)
Declension
edit
Declension of hind
f2 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative hind hindin hindir hindirnar
accusative hind hindina hindir hindirnar
dative hind hindini hindum hindunum
genitive hindar hindarinnar hinda hindanna
Derived terms
edit

Icelandic

edit

Etymology

edit

From Old Norse hind, from Proto-Germanic *hindiz.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

hind f (genitive singular hindar, nominative plural hindir)

  1. female deer, hind

Declension

edit

Old English

edit

Etymology

edit

From Proto-West Germanic *hindi, from Proto-Germanic *hindō, *hindiz, whence also Old High German hinta, Old Norse hind.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

hind f

  1. hind

Declension

edit

Derived terms

edit

Descendants

edit
  • Middle English: hind, hinde, hynde

References

edit

Scots

edit

Alternative forms

edit

Etymology

edit

From Early Scots hyne (stripling), from Northumbrian Old English hīȝu or hīȝan (members of a household).

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

hind (plural hinds)

  1. (archaic) A skilled labourer on a farm, especially a ploughman. In Southern Scotland, specifically a married skilled farmworker given housing in a cottage and often given special privileges in addition to his wages. Occasionally a derogatory term.

Derived terms

edit
  • hindin (the act of being a hind)
  • hindish (to be like a hind; rustic)

Swedish

edit

Etymology

edit

From Old Swedish hind, cognate with Old High German hinta, German Hinde, English hind.

Noun

edit

hind c

  1. a doe, a hind; the female of deer
    skygg som en hind
    shy as a doe
    Man kan ej för samma kärra spänna en häst och en hind.
    One can not harness to the same cart a horse and a trembling doe.

Declension

edit
Declension of hind 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative hind hinden hindar hindarna
Genitive hinds hindens hindars hindarnas

References

edit

Uzbek

edit

Etymology

edit

Inherited from Chagatai هند, from Classical Persian هند (hind).

Noun

edit

hind (plural hindlar)

  1. Indian (person from India)
    hind tiliHindi

Derived terms

edit
edit