See also: Hind

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /haɪnd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪnd

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English hinde, from Old English hindan (at the rear, from behind), Proto-Germanic *hinder (behind, beyond), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱem-ta- (down, below, with, far, along, against), from *ḱóm (beside, near, by, with). Cognate with Gothic 𐌷𐌹𐌽𐌳𐌰𐌽𐌰 (hindana, from beyond), Old Norse hindr (obstacle), Old Norse handan (from that side, beyond), Old High German hintana (behind), Old English hinder (behind, back, in the farthest part, down), Latin contra (in return, against). More at hinder, contrary.

AdjectiveEdit

hind (comparative hinder, superlative hindmost)

  1. Located at the rear (most often said of animals' body parts).
  2. Backward; to the rear.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Wikispecies has information on:

Wikispecies From Middle English hind, hinde, hynde, from Old English hind, Proto-West Germanic *hindu, from Proto-Germanic *hindō, *hindiz, from a formation on Proto-Indo-European *ḱem- (hornless). Cognate with Dutch hinde, German Hinde, Danish hind.

NounEdit

hind (plural hinds)

  1. A female deer, especially a red deer at least two years old.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970, partition III, section 1, member 3:
      Nature binds all creatures to love their young ones; an hen to preserve her brood will run upon a lion, an hind will fight with a bull, a sow with a bear, a silly sheep with a fox.
  2. A spotted food fish of the genus Epinephelus.
SynonymsEdit
  • (female deer): doe
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English hynd, hine, from Old English hī(ġ)na, genitive plural of hīġa (servant, family member), in the phrase hīna fæder ‘paterfamilias’. The -d is a later addition (compare sound). Compare Old Frisian hinde (servant).

NounEdit

hind (plural hinds)

  1. (archaic) A servant, especially an agricultural labourer.

ReferencesEdit

  • hind at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • hind in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hind, from Proto-Germanic *hindiz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hind c (singular definite hinden, plural indefinite hinder or hinde)

  1. hind (female deer)

InflectionEdit


EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *hinta. Cognate with Finnish hinta.

NounEdit

hind (genitive hinna, partitive hinda)

  1. price

DeclensionEdit


FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse hinna.

NounEdit

hind f (genitive singular hindar, plural hindir)

  1. membrane
DeclensionEdit
Declension of hind
f2 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative hind hindin hindir hindirnar
accusative hind hindina hindir hindirnar
dative hind hindini hindum hindunum
genitive hindar hindarinnar hinda hindanna
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse hind, from Proto-Germanic *hindiz.

NounEdit

hind f (genitive singular hindar, plural hindir)

  1. hind (female deer)
DeclensionEdit
Declension of hind
f2 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative hind hindin hindir hindirnar
accusative hind hindina hindir hindirnar
dative hind hindini hindum hindunum
genitive hindar hindarinnar hinda hindanna
Derived termsEdit

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hind, from Proto-Germanic *hindiz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hind f (genitive singular hindar, nominative plural hindir)

  1. female deer, hind

DeclensionEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *hindi, from Proto-Germanic *hindō, *hindiz, whence also Old High German hinta, Old Norse hind.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hind f

  1. hind

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: hind, hinde, hynde

ReferencesEdit


ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Early Scots hyne (stripling), from Northumbrian Old English hīȝu or hīȝan (members of a household).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hind (plural hinds)

  1. (archaic) A skilled labourer on a farm, especially a ploughman. In Southern Scotland, specifically a married skilled farmworker given housing in a cottage and often given special privileges in addition to his wages. Occasionally a derogatory term.

Derived termsEdit

  • hindin (the act of being a hind)
  • hindish (to be like a hind; rustic)

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish hind, cognate with Old High German hinta, German Hinde, English hind.

NounEdit

hind c

  1. a doe, a hind; the female of deer
    skygg som en hind
    shy as a doe
    Man kan ej för samma kärra spänna en häst och en hind.
    One can not harness to the same cart a horse and a trembling doe.

DeclensionEdit

Declension of hind 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative hind hinden hindar hindarna
Genitive hinds hindens hindars hindarnas

ReferencesEdit