See also: -hin, hin-, hīⁿ, and hîn

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English hin, from Latin hin, from Hebrew הִין‎, from Egyptian
h
n
nwwW22
(hnw, jar, unit of liquid volume).

NounEdit

hin (plural hins)

  1. (historical units of measure) A former Hebrew liquid measure of volume (about 3.8 L).
    • 1973, Bible (New International Version), Exodus 30:24:
      500 shekels of cassia — all according to the sanctuary shekel — and a hin of olive oil.
  2. (historical units of measure) An Ancient Egyptian liquid measure of volume (about 0.48 L).
    • 1997, Helaine Selin, Encyclopaedia of the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine in Non-Westen Cultures:
      The hin for liquids was subdivided dimidially down to 132 = 1 ro.
MeronymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hinn. The other Germanic has a similar, but phonologically distinct pronoun in the same function: Proto-Germanic *jainaz, cf. Esimbi ġeon, Old High German jēner, and Gothic 𐌾𐌰𐌹𐌽𐍃 (jains).

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

hin c (neuter hint, plural hine)

  1. (archaic) that (distant in space or time)

FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hinn.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

hin m or f (demonstrative)

  1. the other, that, the

ArticleEdit

hin m or f (definite)

  1. the

DeclensionEdit

Demonstrative pronoun - ávísingarfornavn
Singular (eintal) m f n
Nominative (hvørfall) hin hin hitt
Accusative (hvønnfall) hina
Dative (hvørjumfall) hinum hinari / hini hinum
Genitive (hvørsfall) hins hinnar / hinar hins
Plural (fleirtal) m f n
Nominative (hvørfall) hinir hinar hini
Accusative (hvønnfall) hinar
Dative (hvørjumfall) hinum
Genitive (hvørsfall) hinna



FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Expressive; possibly has roots in various ancient interjections, e.g. Latin hem (eh?, oh!), hui (ho!, ooh!)

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

hin

  1. (onomatopeia, colloquial) heh, ooh, hehe!

GarifunaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hin

  1. fruit

InflectionEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German hina; compare hence.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /hɪn/
  • (file)

AdverbEdit

hin

  1. (to) there; thither (archaic)
    • 1912, Luther, John: 13:36 in the Bible]:
      w:Book of John XIII. 36. Spricht Simon Petrus zu ihm: HERR, wo gehst du hin? Jesus antwortete ihm: Wo ich hin gehe, kannst du mir diesmal nicht folgen; aber du wirst mir nachmals folgen
      Simon Peter said unto him, Lord, whither goest thou? Jesus answered him, Whither I go, thou canst not follow me now; but thou shalt follow me afterwards.

AdjectiveEdit

hin (indeclinable, predicative only)

  1. (colloquial) on the fritz (out of order)
    Synonyms: hinüber, kaputt

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

  • hin” in Duden online
  • hin” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

IcelandicEdit

PronounEdit

hin (demonstrative)

  1. that (female)

DeclensionEdit

ArticleEdit

hin (f)

  1. the (definite article)

DeclensionEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

hin

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ひん

Middle EnglishEdit

PronounEdit

hin

  1. Alternative form of hine

Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hinn.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

hin m (feminine hi, neuter hitt, plural hine)

  1. the other
    Me skal til hi sida av fjorden.
    We are going to the other side of the fjord.

ReferencesEdit


Old NorseEdit

PronounEdit

hin

  1. inflection of hinn:
    1. feminine singular nominative
    2. neuter plural nominative/accusative

DeclensionEdit

ArticleEdit

hin

  1. inflection of hinn:
    1. feminine singular nominative
    2. neuter plural nominative/accusative

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hinn.

The noun has been formed by ellipsis of phrases such as hin håle and hin onde.

PronounEdit

hin

  1. (demonstrative, obsolete) other, the other one; that

Derived termsEdit

ArticleEdit

hin

  1. (obsolete except in set phrases, before an adjective) the (definite article)

Related termsEdit

  • hin håken (the devil) (a euphemism for hin håle)
  • hin håle (the devil) (literally, “the hard one”)
  • hin onde (the devil) (literally, “the evil one”)

NounEdit

hin c

  1. the devil

ReferencesEdit


WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *hin, from Proto-Celtic *sīnā.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hin f (plural hinoedd, not mutable)

  1. (dated) weather
    Synonym: tywydd

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “hin”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

hin c (plural hinnen, diminutive hintsje)

  1. hen
  2. chicken meat

Further readingEdit

  • hin (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

YolaEdit

NounEdit

hin

  1. Alternative form of hen

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 46