EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin lacūna (ditch, gap), diminutive form of lacus (lake). Doublet of lagoon.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ləˈkjuː.nə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ləˈkuː.nə/, /ləˈkjuː.nə/
  • (file)
    ,
    (file)

NounEdit

lacuna (plural lacunae or lacunæ or lacunas)

  1. A small opening; a small pit or depression.
  2. A small blank space; a gap or vacancy; a hiatus.
    • 1912, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Lost World[1]:
      "Our young friend makes up for many obvious mental lacunæ by some measure of primitive common sense," remarked Challenger.
  3. An absent part, especially in a book or other piece of writing, often referring to an ancient manuscript or similar.
    Long lacunae in this inscription make interpretation difficult.
  4. Any gap, break, hole, or lack in a set of things; something missing.
    • 2019, Li Huang; James Lambert, “Another Arrow for the Quiver: A New Methodology for Multilingual Researchers”, in Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, DOI:10.1080/01434632.2019.1596115, page 11:
      If the researcher cannot adequately hear a specific conversation due to its low volume or other acoustic interference, then this data point can be passed over with the understanding that such lacunae will be randomly distributed over the data collecting period.
  5. (microscopy) A space visible between cells, allowing free passage of light.
  6. (translation studies) A language gap, which occurs when there is no direct translation in the target language for a lexical term found in the source language.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin lacuna. Compare the inherited doublet laguna.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lacuna f (plural lacune)

  1. gap
  2. blank (space)
  3. lapse (of memory)

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From lacus (lake, basin).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lacūna f (genitive lacūnae); first declension

  1. a hole, pit
  2. an opening, cavity, hollow, cleft
  3. a gap, void, defect

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative lacūna lacūnae
Genitive lacūnae lacūnārum
Dative lacūnae lacūnīs
Accusative lacūnam lacūnās
Ablative lacūnā lacūnīs
Vocative lacūna lacūnae

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin lacūna. Compare the inherited lagoa and laguna.

NounEdit

lacuna f (plural lacunas)

  1. hiatus (gap in a series)
    Synonym: hiato
  2. blank (space to be filled in)

Related termsEdit