See also: Jump

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) enPR: jŭmp, IPA(key): /dʒʌmp/, [d͡ʒʌmp]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌmp

Etymology 1Edit

 
A tap dancer jumping.

From Middle English jumpen (to walk quickly, run, jump), probably of Middle Low German or North Germanic origin, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *gempaną, *gembaną (to hop, skip, jump), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰemb- (to spring, hop, jump). Cognate with Middle Dutch gumpen (to jump), Low German jumpen (to jump), Middle High German gumpen, gampen (to jump, hop) (dialectal German gampen, Walser dialect kumpu), Danish gumpe (to jolt), Swedish gumpa (to jump), Danish gimpe (to move up and down), Middle English jumpren, jumbren (to mix, jumble). Related to jumble.

VerbEdit

jump (third-person singular simple present jumps, present participle jumping, simple past and past participle jumped)

  1. (intransitive) To propel oneself rapidly upward, downward and/or in any horizontal direction such that momentum causes the body to become airborne.
    The boy jumped over a fence.
    Kangaroos are known for their ability to jump high.
  2. (intransitive) To cause oneself to leave an elevated location and fall downward.
    She is going to jump from the diving board.
  3. (transitive) To pass by a spring or leap; to overleap.
    to jump a stream
  4. (intransitive) To employ a parachute to leave an aircraft or elevated location.
  5. (intransitive) To react to a sudden, often unexpected, stimulus (such as a sharp prick or a loud sound) by jerking the body violently.
    The sudden sharp sound made me jump.
  6. (intransitive) To employ a move in certain board games where one game piece is moved from one legal position to another passing over the position of another piece.
    The player's knight jumped the opponent's bishop.
  7. (transitive) To move to a position in (a queue/line) that is further forward.
    I hate it when people jump the queue.
  8. (transitive) To attack suddenly and violently.
    The hoodlum jumped a woman in the alley.
  9. (transitive, slang) To engage in sexual intercourse with (a person).
    Harold: How is Sarah? I don't want to jump her while she's on the rag.
    - From the motion picture The Big Chill.
  10. (transitive) To cause to jump.
    The rider jumped the horse over the fence.
  11. (transitive) To move the distance between two opposing subjects.
  12. (transitive) To increase the height of a tower crane by inserting a section at the base of the tower and jacking up everything above it.
  13. (cycling, intransitive) To increase speed aggressively and without warning.
  14. (transitive, obsolete) To expose to danger; to risk; to hazard.
  15. (transitive, smithwork) To join by a buttweld.
  16. To thicken or enlarge by endwise blows; to upset.
  17. (quarrying) To bore with a jumper.
  18. (obsolete) To coincide; to agree; to accord; to tally; followed by with.
  19. (intransitive, programming) To start executing code from a different location, rather than following the program counter.
    • 2008, Garry Robinson, Real World Microsoft Access Database Protection and Security:
      When this section is completed, the code generally jumps back to the Exit Section, and the procedure is closed.
  20. (intransitive, slang, archaic) To flee; to make one's escape.
    • 1891, Arthur Conan Doyle, The Red-Headed League:
      “It's all clear,” he whispered. “Have you the chisel and the bags? Great Scott! Jump, Archie, jump, and I'll swing for it!”
      Sherlock Holmes had sprung out and seized the intruder by the collar. The other dived down the hole, and I heard the sound of rending cloth as Jones clutched at his skirts.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

See also jumped, jamp, jumper and jumping

Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

jump (plural jumps)

  1. The act of jumping; a leap; a spring; a bound.
    • (Can we date this quote by John Locke and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      To advance by jumps.
  2. An effort; an attempt; a venture.
  3. (mining) A dislocation in a stratum; a fault.
  4. (architecture) An abrupt interruption of level in a piece of brickwork or masonry.
  5. An instance of propelling oneself upwards.
    The boy took a skip and a jump down the lane.
  6. An object which causes one to jump, a ramp.
    He went off a jump.
  7. An instance of causing oneself to fall from an elevated location.
    There were a couple of jumps from the bridge.
  8. An instance of employing a parachute to leave an aircraft or elevated location.
    She was terrified before the jump, but was thrilled to be skydiving.
  9. An instance of reacting to a sudden stimulus by jerking the body.
  10. A jumping move in a board game.
    the knight's jump in chess
  11. A button (of a joypad, joystick or similar device) used to make a video game character jump (propel itself upwards).
    Press jump to start.
  12. (sports, horses) An obstacle that forms part of a showjumping course, and that the horse has to jump over cleanly.
    Heartless managed the scale the first jump but fell over the second.
  13. (with on) An early start or an advantage.
    He got a jump on the day because he had laid out everything the night before.
    Their research department gave them the jump on the competition.
  14. (mathematics) A discontinuity in the graph of a function, where the function is continuous in a punctured interval of the discontinuity.
  15. (science fiction) An instance of faster-than-light travel, not observable from ordinary space.
  16. (programming) A change of the path of execution to a different location.
  17. (US, informal, automotive) Short for jump-start.
    My car won't start. Could you give me a jump?
  18. (theater) Synonym of one-night stand (single evening's performance)
    • 1950, Billboard (23 December 1950, page 36)
      Next jump will be at the Chicago Theater, Chicago.
QuotationsEdit
SynonymsEdit
  • (instance of propelling oneself into the air): leap
  • (instance of causing oneself to fall from an elevated location):
  • (instance of employing a parachute to leave an aircraft or elevated location):
  • (instance of reacting to a sudden stimulus by jerking the body): flinch, jerk, twitch
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AdverbEdit

jump (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) exactly; precisely
    • c. 1599–1601, Shakespeare, William, Hamlet, act 1, scene 1, lines 64–65:
      Thus twice before, and jump at this dead hour,
      With martial stalk hath he gone by our watch.
SynonymsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

jump (comparative more jump, superlative most jump)

  1. (obsolete) Exact; matched; fitting; precise.
    • (Can we date this quote by Ben Jonson and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      jump names
    • 1600, Shakespeare, Hamlet:
      Thus twice before, and jump at this dead hour, / With martial stalk hath he gone by our watch

Etymology 2Edit

Compare French jupe (a long petticoat, a skirt) and English jupon.

NounEdit

jump (plural jumps)

  1. A kind of loose jacket for men.
Related termsEdit