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See also: Lien, líen, liền, and liên

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Middle French lien, from Latin ligāmen (a bond), from ligō (tie, bind).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

lien (plural liens)

  1. (obsolete) A tendon.
  2. (law) A right to take possession of a debtor’s property as security until a debt or duty is discharged.
    • 2002, Colin Jones, The Great Nation, Penguin 2003, p. 7:
      Bodin deemed the king of France's power as absolute in the sense that the ruler was ‘absolved’ by divine sanction from legally binding liens and restrictions.
QuotationsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lien

  1. (biblical, archaic) Alternative form of lain
    1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, [], OCLC 964384981, Genesis 26:10:
    And Abimelech said, What is this thou hast done vnto vs? one of the people might lightly haue lien with thy wife, and thou shouldest haue brought guiltinesse vpon vs.”
    1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, [], OCLC 964384981, Numbers 5:19:
    And the Priest shall charge her by an othe, and say vnto the woman, If no man haue lyen with thee, and if thou hast not gone aside to vncleannesse with another in stead of thy husband, be thou free from this bitter water that causeth the curse.

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from Latin lien (spleen).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlaɪ.in/, /ˈlaɪ.ən/

NounEdit

lien (plural lienes)

  1. (uncommon, possibly obsolete) The spleen.
    • 1892, John Marie Keating, Henry Hamilton, John Chalmers Da Costa, A New Pronouncing Dictionary of Medicine:
      Li'enal. Pertaining to the lien or spleen; splenic.
    • 1914, Quain's Elements of Anatomy, volume 1, page 312:
      The lien or spleen (figs. 282 to 285) is a soft, highly vascular contractile and very elastic organ of a dark purplish colour. It is placed obliquely behind the stomach, [...]
Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lien m (plural liennow)

  1. literature

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French lien, from Old French lien, liem, from Latin ligāmen (bond), from ligō.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ljɛ̃/
  • (file)

NounEdit

lien m (plural liens)

  1. link

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Old Irish selg, Lithuanian blužnis, Ancient Greek σπλήν (splḗn), Old Armenian փայծաղն (pʿaycałn), Avestan 𐬯𐬞𐬆𐬭𐬆𐬰𐬀𐬥-(spərəzan-), Sanskrit प्लीहन् (plīhán). Doublet of splen.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

liēn m (genitive liēnis); third declension

  1. spleen

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative liēn liēnēs
Genitive liēnis liēnum
Dative liēnī liēnibus
Accusative liēnem liēnēs
Ablative liēne liēnibus
Vocative liēn liēnēs

ReferencesEdit


LatvianEdit

VerbEdit

lien

  1. 2nd person singular present indicative form of līst
  2. 3rd person singular present indicative form of līst
  3. 3rd person plural present indicative form of līst
  4. 2nd person singular imperative form of līst
  5. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of līst
  6. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of līst

LivonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Related to Finnish lainata.

VerbEdit

lien

  1. (Salaca) give a loan

Middle DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Dutch *līan, from Proto-Germanic [Term?].

VerbEdit

liën

  1. (transitive) to admit
  2. (transitive) to acknowledge, to be convinced
  3. (transitive) to declare
  4. (intransitive) to assent
InflectionEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Dutch līan, from Proto-Germanic *līhwaną, from Proto-Indo-European *leykʷ-.

VerbEdit

liën

  1. (eastern) to lend
InflectionEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Further readingEdit

  • liën (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • liën (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929
  • liën (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French lien.

NounEdit

lien m (plural liens)

  1. tie; strap
  2. (by extension) link (association)

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • lïen (diareses not universally used in transcriptions of Old French)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ligāmen.

NounEdit

lien m (oblique plural liens, nominative singular liens, nominative plural lien)

  1. tie; strap
    • late 12th century, anonymous, La Folie de Tristan d'Oxford, page 408 (of the Champion Classiques edition of Le Roman de Tristan, →ISBN, lines 901-2:
      Brenguain, ore alez pur le chen,
      amenez k'od tut le lïen
      Brangain, go get the dog,
      bring it with its leash

DescendantsEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

lien

  1. definite singular of lie